Pathology of the distal condyles of the third metacarpal and third metatarsal bones of the horse

Authors

  • C. M. RIGGS,

    1. Division of Equine Studies, Departments of Veterinary Clinical Science, University of Liverpool, Leahurst, Neston, South Wirrai, L64 7TE
    2. Division of Equine Studies, Department of Animal Husbandry, Radiodiagnosis, University of Liverpool, Leahurst, Neston, South Wirrai, L64 7TE
    Search for more papers by this author
  • G. H. WHITEHOUSE,

    1. Division of Equine Studies, Departments of Veterinary Clinical Science, University of Liverpool, Leahurst, Neston, South Wirrai, L64 7TE
    2. Division of Equine Studies, Department of Animal Husbandry, Radiodiagnosis, University of Liverpool, Leahurst, Neston, South Wirrai, L64 7TE
    Search for more papers by this author
  • A. BOYDE

    1. Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK.
    Search for more papers by this author

Summary

This study examined material from Thoroughbred horses, the majority of which had been in race training, for evidence of pathology in the third metacarpal (McIII) and third metatarsal (MtIII) bones which might be related to the occurrence of distal condylar fractures. Whole bone samples were studied and documented by macrophotography prior to macroradiography and computed tomographic (CT) imaging. Microradiographs were made from 100 μm thick mediolateral sections cut perpendicular to the dorsal and palmar/plantar articular surfaces of distal condylar regions of McIII and MtIII. Blocks were prepared for morphological imaging using the backscattered electron mode of scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Linear defects in mineralised articular cartilage and subchondral bone were found in the palmar/plantar aspects of the condylar grooves adjacent to the sagittal ridge. These were closely related to the pattern of densification of the subchondral bone and were associated with intense focal remodelling of the immediately adjacent and subjacent bone. Parasagittal fractures of the condyles originated in similar defects. A unifying hypothesis for the aetiopathogenesis of these fractures is presented.

Ancillary