The effect of supramaximal exercise on equine platelet function

Authors

  • JANENE K. KINGSTON,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164–6610, USA.
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  • SARAH N. SAMPSON,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164–6610, USA.
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  • LAURIE A. BEARD,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164–6610, USA.
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    • Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.

  • K. M. MEYERS,

    1. Department of Veterinary Comparative Pharmacology and Physiology, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164–6610, USA.
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  • DEBRA C. SELLON,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164–6610, USA.
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  • W. M. BAYLY

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164–6610, USA.
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Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164–6610, USA.

Summary

When blood is collected into sodium citrate in the proportion of 9 parts blood:1 part sodium citrate, the concentration of plasma sodium citrate in the sample will depend on the packed cell volume (PCV) of the blood sample. This difference in plasma sodium citrate concentration secondary to alterations in PCV significantly affects human platelet aggregation responses. Since horses attain a high PCV in response to high-intensity exercise we investigated the effect of differences in sample plasma sodium citrate concentration on equine platelet aggregability. In addition, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) was evaluated as an alternative anticoagulant for assessment of platelet aggregability during strenuous exercise in horses. Blood samples were collected pre-exercise and at fatigue after supramaximal treadmill exercise into either 3.8% sodium citrate (9 parts blood:1 part sodium citrate) or 20 u LMWH/ ml of blood. Platelet aggregation responses to 1.25 μmol/l adenosine diphosphate (ADP) were measured via optical aggregometry. For samples collected into sodium citrate, aggregability was significantly less than pre-exercise values in samples collected at fatigue and in pre-exercise samples in which sodium citrate concentrations were adjusted to equal those in fatigue samples. However, samples collected into LMWH showed significantly increased platelet aggregability in samples collected at fatigue when compared to pre-exercise samples. In conclusion, higher plasma sodium citrate concentration had a marked inhibitory effect on equine platelet aggregation responses. Low molecular weight heparin was a good alternative anticoagulant for assessment of equine platelet function and results indicate that equine platelet aggregability was enhanced in response to supramaximal exercise.

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