Get access

High-field magnetic resonance imaging investigation of distal border fragments of the navicular bone in horses with foot pain

Authors

  • M. BIGGI,

    1. Universita' degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche Veterinarie - Reparto di Radiologia, Italy; and Centre for Equine Studies, Animal Health Trust, UK.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • S. DYSON

    Corresponding author
    1. Universita' degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche Veterinarie - Reparto di Radiologia, Italy; and Centre for Equine Studies, Animal Health Trust, UK.
    Search for more papers by this author

email: sue.dyson@aht.org.uk

Summary

Reasons for performing study: Distal border fragments of the navicular bone can be seen in lame and nonlame horses and their clinical significance remains open to debate.

Objectives: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of distal border fragments and the adjacent navicular bone. To investigate the relationship between fragments and other abnormalities of the navicular bone and the distal sesamoidean impar ligament (DSIL).

Methods: Horses were included if pain causing forelimb lameness was localised to the foot and high-field MR images were acquired. The size and location of distal border fragments were recorded. Abnormalities in the adjacent navicular bone were graded to obtain a fragment grade. A total navicular bone grade was assigned. The DSIL was also graded. A Chi-squared test was used to test for associations between the presence of a fragment and specific lesions involving the distal border of the navicular bone, the total grade of the navicular bone, and the grade of the DSIL.

Results: 427 horses were included and 111 fragments observed. There was a significant association between the presence of a fragment and the total navicular bone grade, osseous cyst-like lesions, increased number and size of the synovial invaginations of the distal border, increased signal intensity on fat suppressed images and size of distal border entheseophytes.

Conclusions: There is an association between distal border fragments and other pathological MRI abnormalities of the navicular bone.

Potential relevance: Distal border fragments are part of navicular disease, but their contribution to pain and lameness remains to be clarified.

Ancillary