Validation and comparison of two methods of measuring lactate in equine plasma

Authors

  • P. BUTUDOM,

    Corresponding author
      email: navichaya@kku.ac.th
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  • J. H. FOREMAN,

    1. Department of Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 Thailand; Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, 61802, USA
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  • K. H. KLINE,

    1. Department of Animal Sciences, College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, 61801, USA
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  • E. L. WHITTEM

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria, 3030, Australia
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email: navichaya@kku.ac.th

Abstract

Summary

Reasons for performing study: Some methods of lactate (LA) measurement have not been validated appropriately for use in horses.

Objectives: To validate 2 LA analysers (YSI 2300 Stat Plus and TDx Lactic Acid Assay) for use with equine plasma and to compare plasma [LA] determined by the 2 methods.

Methods: Both instruments were evaluated for linearity, parallelism, recovery and precision using serial dilutions of standard LA solutions and equine plasma and then comparing results with linear regression or paired t tests. Plasma [LA] results were compared in 275 blood samples collected from horses exercising at various intensities using Bland-Altman analysis. Level of significance was P<0.05.

Results:

YSI exhibited good linearity for both LA standards and equine plasma (P<0.05) at 0–30 mmol/l. TDx had good linearity at 0–12 mmol/l (P<0.05); with LA standard solutions >12 mmol/l and with equine plasma, linearity was decreased. YSI exhibited good parallelism between LA standards and equine plasma LA measurements throughout the 0–30 mmol/l range (P>0.05). Parallelism was poor with TDx (P<0.05). Mean ± s.d. % recovery was 101.7 ± 3.4% for YSI (acceptable) and 110.6 ± 8.4% for TDx (unacceptable). Within-run and mean between-run coefficients of variation (CV) for plasma samples tested from 3.3–29.5 mmol/l were 0.4–3.0% for YSI. CVs for samples tested from 2.8–8.0 mmol/l were 17.4–24.1% for TDx. In 275 plasma samples, [LA] ranged from 0.1–42.7 mmol/l and 0.3–50.6 mmol/l for the YSI and TDx methods, respectively. The difference in plasma [LA] determined by the 2 methods was −1.0 ± 3.2 mmol/l, documenting that the TDx overestimated the YSI results by a mean value of 1 mmol/l.

Conclusions: It was concluded that the YSI method was a reliable method for measuring equine plasma [LA] from 0–30 mmol/l. The TDx method was found not to be suitable for use with equine plasma due to greater variability in measurements (high CV).

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