CREATIVITY AND INTELLIGENCE: A PARTIAL REPLICATION WITH SCOTTISH CHILDREN OF GETZELS‘ AND JACKSON'S STUDY

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Abstract

Getzels & Jackson (1962) found that, when two contrasting groups of children were formed, one of high scorers on tests of divergent thinking or ‘creativity’, the other of high i.q., (a) both groups scored equally on tests of attainment, (b) teachers rated the ‘high creativity’ group rather lower on desirability as pupils. In the whole sample (mean i.q. 132) from which the groups were drawn correlations between i.q. and measures of creativity were relatively low. Similar tests were given to 175 Scottish children (mean i.q. 102). Correlations between i.q. and measures of creativity were much higher, in spite of a smaller range of ability. When contrasting ‘high creativity’ and ‘high i.q.’ groups, it was found that the ‘high i.q.’ group was preferred by teachers, as in Getzels and Jackson's study. Contrary to their findings, the ‘high creativity’ group was lower in attainment. Results are also presented for children who were high scorers in both ‘creativity’ and ‘intelligence’. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are discussed.

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