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    Robert Brotherton, Christopher C. French, Belief in Conspiracy Theories and Susceptibility to the Conjunction Fallacy, Applied Cognitive Psychology, 2014, 28, 2
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    Daniel Jolley, Karen M. Douglas, The social consequences of conspiracism: Exposure to conspiracy theories decreases intentions to engage in politics and to reduce one's carbon footprint, British Journal of Psychology, 2014, 105, 1
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