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The association between acculturation and recreational computer use among Latino adolescents in California

Authors


Address for correspondence: Dr L Shi, 650 Charles E. Young Drive South, 61-253 CHS, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1772, USA. E-mail: Lushi.pku@gmail.com

Summary

Background

Physical inactivity like recreational computer use is a likely factor in the rising obesity prevalence among Latino adolescents.

Objectives

Using the data from California Health Interview Survey, we test the hypothesis whether acculturation is associated with recreational computer use among Latino adolescents.

Methods

We run linear regressions of the weekly time spent on recreational computer use among Latino adolescents, stratified first by gender and then by age group (12–14 and 15–17 years). Years living in the United States and language at home are used as key variables for acculturation.

Results

For all four sub-populations, living in the United States for less than 5 years is significantly associated with fewer hours on recreational computer use, compared with those US-born. Among female adolescents, those who lived in the United States for 10 years or more spent fewer hours on recreational computer use than those US-born. Among adolescents under 15, speaking English only and speaking English plus another language are both significantly associated with more hours on recreational computer use, compared with those who speak a non-English language at home.

Conclusion

Educators and health professionals should heed the Latino adolescents’ possible increase in recreational computer use.

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