Excessive weight gain in women with a normal pre-pregnancy BMI is associated with increased neonatal adiposity

Authors

  • J. L. Josefson,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    • Division of Endocrinology, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. A. Hoffmann,

    1. Department of Medical Education, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • B. E. Metzger

    1. Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

Address for correspondence: Dr J. Josefson, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, 225 East Chicago Avenue, Box 54, Chicago, IL 60611-2605, USA. E-mail: j-josefson@northwestern.edu

Summary

Background

More than 40% of women with a normal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) exceed the 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines’ recommended weight gain of 25–35 lb. Excessive gestational weight gain is one modifiable factor that may be contributing to childhood overweight and obesity.

Objective

The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in adiposity from neonates born to mothers with a normal pre-pregnancy BMI who either gained within or above IOM guidelines.

Methods

Neonatal adiposity was measured within 72 h of birth by the method of air displacement plethysmography.

Results

Compared with mothers who gained within IOM guidelines (N = 27), mothers with excessive gestational weight gain (N = 11) (mean 29.0 vs. 45.2 lb) had neonates with 50% more fat mass (348 vs. 525 g) and 3% greater body fat (10.7 vs. 13.9%).

Conclusions

Increased adiposity at birth may predispose these children to increased risk of obesity and highlight the importance that women avoid gaining excessive weight in pregnancy.

Ancillary