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Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment

Ten Indigenous Edible Plants: Contemporary Use in Eastern Crete, Greece

Authors

  • Antonia Psaroudaki,

    1. Department of Crop Science, Laboratory of Plant Breeding and Biometry, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece
    2. Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Crete, Greece
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  • Petros Dimitropoulakis,

    1. Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Crete, Greece
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  • Theophanis Constantinidis,

    1. Department of Ecology and Systematics, Faculty of Biology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
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  • Andreas Katsiotis,

    1. Department of Crop Science, Laboratory of Plant Breeding and Biometry, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece
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  • George N. Skaracis

    1. Department of Crop Science, Laboratory of Plant Breeding and Biometry, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece
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Abstract

In the present study, ten species of indigenous edible plants of Eastern Crete were collected, recorded, and botanically classified. Moreover, a survey study was conducted regarding the collection and use of edible wild greens in today's diet of the inhabitants of Eastern Crete. The results of the study showed that there is a positive correlation between the collection and consumption of edible wild plants and the age and profession of the collector. It was also clear that greens that are abundantly found and grow in nearby areas are preferred. Older people identify and collect a larger number of different species of plants compared with younger people. This fact demonstrates the risk of losing important nutritional information, although a large percentage of the sample teaches others the art of identifying and collecting wild plants.

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