Evaluating Pore Space in Macroporous Ceramics with Water-Based Porosimetry

Authors

  • Linnéa Andersson,

    Corresponding authorCurrent affiliation:
    1. Oregon State University, School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering
    • Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Per Tomas Larsson,

    1. WWSC, Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Stockholm, Sweden
    2. Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden
    3. Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Lars Wågberg,

    1. WWSC, Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Stockholm, Sweden
    2. Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Lennart Bergström

    1. Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    2. WWSC, Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Based in part on the thesis submitted by L. Andersson for the PhD degree in materials chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden, 2011.

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: linnea.andersson@oregonstate.edu

Abstract

We show that water-based porosimetry (WBP), a facile, simple, and nondestructive porosimetry technique, accurately evaluates both the pore size distribution and throat size distribution of sacrificially templated macroporous alumina. The pore size distribution and throat size distribution derived from the WBP evaluation in uptake (imbibition) and release (drainage) mode, respectively, were corroborated by mercury porosimetry and X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT). In contrast with mercury porosimetry, the WBP also provided information on the presence of “dead-end pores” in the macroporous alumina.

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