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Influence of Y and La Additions on Grain Growth and the Grain-Boundary Character Distribution of Alumina

Authors

  • Stephanie A. Bojarski,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Michael Stuer,

    1. Powder Technology Laboratory, Material Science Institute, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne, Switzerland
    2. Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Zhe Zhao,

    1. Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Paul Bowen,

    1. Powder Technology Laboratory, Material Science Institute, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne, Switzerland
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  • Gregory S. Rohrer

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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Abstract

Grain-boundary character distributions (GBCDs) were determined for spark plasma sintered Y- and La-doped aluminas prepared at temperatures between 1450°C and 1600°C. La doping leads to grain boundaries that adopt (0001) orientations 3.7 times more frequently than expected in a random distribution, whereas the Y-doped microstructures are more equiaxed. At 1500°C, some of the boundaries in the Y-doped samples transform to a higher mobility complexion; in this microstructure, the math formula grain-boundary plane is 1.3 times more likely to occur than expected in a random distribution. After the fast-growing grains impinge, the dominant plane becomes math formula and these boundaries have areas that are 1.2 times more likely to occur than expected in a random distribution. The grain-boundary planes in the Y- and La-codoped samples preferred (0001) and math formula orientations, combining the characteristics of the singly doped samples. Grain boundaries with a 60° misorientation about [0001] were up to six times more common than random in the Y-doped samples. The preference for (0001) oriented grain-boundary planes in the La-doped sample persisted at all specific misorientations.

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