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Keywords:

  • behaviour;
  • contributing factors;
  • nurses;
  • Resistance to Care

Abstract

Aims

This article reports results of a study of contributing factors and associated behaviours in specific clinical areas to resistance to care episodes.

Background

Resistance to Care has previously been studied in aged care settings, and previous studies have reported patient behaviours and appropriate responses. Resistance to Care is a defensive response by patients towards healthcare staff and is demonstrated in various non-compliant behaviours.

Design

Cross-sectional study.

Methods

A cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of nurses (n = 5044), who were members of the New South Wales Nurses' Association in Australia, was conducted in 2008–2009.

Results

Resistance to Care episodes occur in various clinical settings and may be precipitated by a range of clinical diagnoses and symptoms. They may also be triggered during various nursing activities that nurses recognize as high-risk for these episodes.

Conclusion

The reported Resistance to Care behaviours are similar to those reported in studies of aggression and violence; however, they require a substantially different response by nurses in various clinical contexts.