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Person-centredness and its association with resident well-being in dementia care units

Authors

  • Karin Sjögren MSc RNT,

    PhD Student, Corresponding author
    • Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden
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  • Marie Lindkvist PhD,

    Senior lecture
    1. Department of Statistics, Umeå School of Business and Economics, Umeå University, Sweden
    2. Epidemiology and Global Health, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden
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  • Per-Olof Sandman PhD RNT,

    Professor
    1. Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Karin Zingmark PhD RNT,

    Associate Professor
    1. Research Department, County Council of Norrbotten, Sweden
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  • David Edvardsson PhD RN

    Associate Professor
    1. Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden
    2. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
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Correspondence to K. Sjögren:e-mail: karin.sjogren@nurs.umu.se

Abstract

Aim

To report a study of the relationship between person-centred care and ability to perform activities of daily living, quality of life, levels of pain, depressive symptoms, and agitated behaviours among residents with dementia in residential care facilities.

Background

Standardized measurements of person-centred care have not previously been used to investigate the relationship between person-centred care and well-being for residents with dementia in residential aged care units.

Design

This study had a cross-sectional design.

Method

Staff and resident surveys were used in a sample of 1261 residents with dementia and 1169 staff from 151 residential care units throughout Sweden. Valid and reliable scales were used to measure person-centredness and ability to perform activities of daily living, quality of life, levels of pain, depressive symptoms, and agitated behaviours in residents. All data were collected in May 2010.

Findings

Person-centred care was correlated with residents' ability to perform activities of daily living. Furthermore, residents in units with higher levels of person-centred care were rated as having higher quality of life and better ability to perform activities of daily living compared with residents in units with lower levels of person-centred care.

Conclusions

There seems to be a relationship between person-centredness, residents' ability to perform activities of daily living, and residents' quality of life. Further studies are needed to explain the variation of person-centredness between units and the extent and ways this might impact on the quality of life and well-being of frail older residents with cognitive impairments in clinical practice.

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