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Emotional rescue: the role of emotional intelligence and emotional labour on well-being and job-stress among community nurses

Authors

  • Leila Karimi BA MA PhD,

    Senior Lecturer
    1. Health Services Management, School of Public Health and Human Biosciences, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Sandra G. Leggat MHSc MBA PhD,

    Professor
    1. School of Public Health and Human Biosciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
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  • Lisa Donohue DipApplSc GradDip PhD,

    Adjunct Associate Professor
    1. School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Gerald Farrell MSc PhD RN,

    Professor
    1. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
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  • Greta E. Couper BA MBA PhD

    Associate Professor, Adjunct Researcher
    1. School of Psychology, Northcentral University, USA
    2. Department of Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California (UCLA), California, USA
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Correspondence to L. Karimi:

e-mail: l.karimi@latrobe.edu.au

Abstract

Aims

To investigate the extent to which emotional labour and emotional intelligence are associated with well-being and job-stress among a group of Australian community nurses. The moderating role of emotional intelligence was evaluated as a key factor in the rescue of healthcare workers from job-stress, thus increasing job retention.

Background

Although emotional labour has been broadly investigated in the literature, the contribution of emotional labour and emotional intelligence to the well-being and experience of job-stress in a community nursing setting requires further exploration.

Design

This study used a cross-sectional quantitative research design with data collected from Australian community nurses.

Methods

Australian community nurses (n = 312) reported on their perceived emotional labour, emotional intelligence and their levels of well-being and job-stress using a paper and pencil survey in 2010.

Results/Findings

Results from structural equation modelling support the hypothesis that both emotional labour and emotional intelligence have significant effects on nurses' well-being and perceived job-stress. Emotional intelligence plays a moderating role in the experience of job-stress.

Conclusion

These findings provide additional evidence for the important effects that emotional labour and emotional intelligence can have on well-being and job-stress among community nurses. The potential benefits of emotional intelligence in the nurses' emotional work have been explored.

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