Get access

Integrative review: nurses' and physicians' experiences and attitudes towards inpatient-witnessed resuscitation of an adult patient

Authors

  • Natalia Sak-Dankosky MNSc RN,

    Doctoral Candidate, Corresponding author
    1. Department of Nursing Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Paweł Andruszkiewicz PhD MD,

    Assistant Professor
    1. 2nd Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, The Medical University of Warsaw, Poland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Paula R. Sherwood PhD RN FAAN,

    Professor, Vice Chair of Research
    1. Department of Acute and Tertiary Care, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
    2. Department of Neurological Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Tarja Kvist PhD RN

    University Researcher
    1. Department of Nursing Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Aim

An integrative review of attitudes and experiences of healthcare professionals regarding family-witnessed resuscitation.

Background

Allowing family members to be present during resuscitation has been a topic of debate in the last years. Increased focus on family centred care led to preparation of official statements concerning this phenomenon. While in some countries witnessed resuscitation is accepted and used, there are many places where it is not respected and remains controversial.

Design

Integrative literature review.

Data sources

Databases: CINAHL, PsycINFO and PubMed.

Review methods

Cooper's five-stage integrative review method has been used. Results were limited to original publications in English, published between 2007–2012, describing nurses' and doctors' experiences and attitudes on inpatient family-witnessed resuscitation of an adult patient.

Results

Fifteen articles were included. Healthcare professionals indicated different opinions on family-witnessed resuscitation. Perceptions vary in different cultural settings. There are both positive and negative effects of this practice on the family members and the rescue team. There is a lack of local guidelines.

Conclusion

Further research with larger sample sizes and different cultural settings would help identify outcomes following the family presence during resuscitation practice. Qualitative research is needed to examine the impact of those outcomes and develop policies and guidelines on cultural variability.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary