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Keywords:

  • adherence;
  • evidence;
  • guideline implementation;
  • influenza prevention;
  • promoting action on research implementation in health services;
  • nursing

Abstract

Aim

To examine associations between perceptions of evidence (research evidence, clinical expertise, patient preferences) and outcomes of a nationwide programme to implement H1N1 influenza prevention guidelines.

Background

Healthcare workers do not consistently adhere to recommended infection control practices and this may be associated with their perceptions of evidence sources.

Design

Cross-sectional mailed survey.

Method

A survey of healthcare workers was administered in August 2010 after implementation of H1N1 prevention guidelines. Outcomes of interest were ratings of adherence to H1N1 prevention guidelines.

Findings

Respondents with complete data (= 283) were included in analyses. Facility-level adherence to guidelines was associated with opinions of clinical experts. Healthcare workers who rated clinical expertise as aligning with recommendations also rated their facilities as being more adherent to guidelines. Perceptions of research evidence and patient preferences were not associated with facility adherence. Personal adherence was not associated with perceptions of evidence, except among those healthcare workers who rated both clinical experts and patients as unsupportive of guidelines; these practitioners were less likely to adhere to recommended personal hygiene practices.

Conclusion

Efforts to implement guidelines might be most effective when capitalizing on the influence of clinical experts. To better explain variability in guideline adherence, inclusion of a broader array of variables is recommended for future studies.