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Keywords:

  • decision-making;
  • discourse analysis;
  • father(s);
  • heteronormativity;
  • midwifery;
  • neoliberalism;
  • nurses;
  • nursing

Abstract

Aim

This study analyses discourses that migrant fathers in New Zealand draw on to explain their decision to have a child.

Background

Little is known about migrant men's reproductive decisions in the context of contemporary/active fatherhood.

Design

A discourse analytic research study.

Methods

Qualitative research was conducted in 2009 where Chinese and Indian migrant men took part in focus groups.

Results/Findings

Fathers drew on two key discourses to understand how they became fathers. The first was fatherhood as a financial decision and the second was fatherhood as a natural process. These two discourses are not always congruent.

Conclusion

Understanding the discourses that shape men's decisions to have a child, will enhance nurses' capacity to provide appropriate care and support for migrant families.