Exploring selection and recruitment processes for newly qualified nurses: a sequential-explanatory mixed-method study

Authors


Abstract

Aim

To map current selection and recruitment processes for newly qualified nurses and to explore the advantages and limitations of current selection and recruitment processes.

Background

The need to improve current selection and recruitment practices for newly qualified nurses is highlighted in health policy internationally.

Design

A cross-sectional, sequential-explanatory mixed-method design with 4 components: (1) Literature review of selection and recruitment of newly qualified nurses; and (2) Literature review of a public sector professions’ selection and recruitment processes; (3) Survey mapping existing selection and recruitment processes for newly qualified nurses; and (4) Qualitative study about recruiters’ selection and recruitment processes.

Methods

Literature searches on the selection and recruitment of newly qualified candidates in teaching and nursing (2005–2013) were conducted. Cross-sectional, mixed-method data were collected from thirty-one (= 31) individuals in health providers in London who had responsibility for the selection and recruitment of newly qualified nurses using a survey instrument. Of these providers who took part, six (= 6) purposively selected to be interviewed qualitatively.

Results

Issues of supply and demand in the workforce, rather than selection and recruitment tools, predominated in the literature reviews. Examples of tools to measure values, attitudes and skills were found in the nursing literature. The mapping exercise found that providers used many selection and recruitment tools, some providers combined tools to streamline process and assure quality of candidates.

Conclusions

Most providers had processes which addressed the issue of quality in the selection and recruitment of newly qualified nurses. The ‘assessment centre model’, which providers were adopting, allowed for multiple levels of assessment and streamlined recruitment. There is a need to validate the efficacy of the selection tools.

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