A longitudinal study of aspects of a hospital's family-centred nursing: changing practice through data translation

Authors

  • Chris White MA RN,

    Practice Development Education Nurse Manager, Honorary Lecturer, Corresponding author
    1. Nursing Research and Practice Development Unit, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    2. University of Technology Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Valerie Wilson PhD RN RSCN

    Director and Professor of Nursing Research and Practice Development
    1. Nursing Research and Practice Development Unit, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    2. The University of Technology Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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Abstract

Aims

To examine how results and data from multiple Family Centred Nursing Index surveys help the development of family-centred nursing at organizational and ward levels.

Design

A critical analysis of survey data.

Background

The Family Centred Nursing Index provides a valid and reliable assessment of aspects of nursing, through a comprehensive survey of traditional indicators of practice development and a broader range of aspects of practice.

Methods

A survey with 113 questions, each to be answered on 7-point Likert scale conducted six times in the last 7 years. Surveys have been in 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011/2012 and 2012/2013. All nurses employed by the organization can participate.

Results

These are reported as means across 19 constructs linked to five key domains and their significance is examined by year and (in the clinical settings) and compared against the organizational (whole population) averages. Ongoing survey and analysis of nurses' views of their work is providing a valuable source of developmental data. The results show unexpected associations between constructs e.g. – a high level of work stress does not correlate with a lower level of job satisfaction (and vice versa). A clear historical picture of many elements of developing family-centred care is emerging at both the organizational and individual-ward levels.

Conclusion

This study provides insights into aspects of organizational and wards working environment for nurses and how these aspects of nurses' work interact in unexpected ways. It is appropriate for providing information to organizations and ward teams in relation to their development towards family-centred cultures.

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