Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 82 Issue 1

January 2013

Volume 82, Issue 1

Pages 1–285

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. Reviews
    5. ‘How to…’ paper
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Population ecology
    9. Parasite and disease ecology
    10. Life histories
    11. Community ecology
    12. Climate ecology
    1. You have free access to this content
      Publishing the best original research in animal ecology: looking forward from 2013 (pages 1–2)

      Tim Coulson, Graeme Hays, Mike Boots, Ken Wilson, Liz Baker and Peter Livermore

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12026

  2. In Focus

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. Reviews
    5. ‘How to…’ paper
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Population ecology
    9. Parasite and disease ecology
    10. Life histories
    11. Community ecology
    12. Climate ecology
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      Predicting responses to climate change requires all life-history stages (pages 3–5)

      Sara Zeigler

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12032

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      This In Focus article puts the article by Radchuk et al in a broader climate change context, summarizing the research, highlighting the significance of the findings, and making recommendations for future work.

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. Reviews
    5. ‘How to…’ paper
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Population ecology
    9. Parasite and disease ecology
    10. Life histories
    11. Community ecology
    12. Climate ecology
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      Evidence-based control of canine rabies: a critical review of population density reduction (pages 6–14)

      Michelle K. Morters, Olivier Restif, Katie Hampson, Sarah Cleaveland, James L. N. Wood and Andrew J. K. Conlan

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02033.x

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      Canine rabies kills at least 55,000 people every year. Culling is commonly used to control rabies despite strong evidence that it is ineffective. Here, for the first time, the rationale for culling is examined, which is of importance to the large body of people involved in canine rabies control internationally.

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      Mosquito ecology and control of malaria (pages 15–25)

      H. Charles J. Godfray

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12003

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      Malaria, vectored by Anopheles mosquitoes, sickens about 200 million people a year and probably kills somewhere between 0.6 and 1.2 million. This article reviews vector control measures, including insecticides and novel genetic and molecular approaches, and emphasises the importance of understanding mosquito ecology to further progress.

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      Female ornaments revisited – are they correlated with offspring quality? (pages 26–38)

      Jarle T. Nordeide, Jukka Kekäläinen, Matti Janhunen and Raine Kortet

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12021

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      A growing number of studies demonstrate negative association between female ornaments and offspring quality, especially common in carotenoids-based-ornaments and in studies on fishes. This is important since it challenges the generality of the direct selection hypothesis to account for female fineries, which has received strong support recently.

  4. ‘How to…’ paper

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. Reviews
    5. ‘How to…’ paper
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Population ecology
    9. Parasite and disease ecology
    10. Life histories
    11. Community ecology
    12. Climate ecology
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      Quantifying individual variation in behaviour: mixed-effect modelling approaches (pages 39–54)

      Niels J. Dingemanse and Ned A. Dochtermann

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12013

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      Tools for decomposing phenotypic variance into between- and within-individual components is of crucial important for many current scientific questions in animal ecology. This “How to” paper provides an overview of the tools to do so.

  5. Trophic interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. Reviews
    5. ‘How to…’ paper
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Population ecology
    9. Parasite and disease ecology
    10. Life histories
    11. Community ecology
    12. Climate ecology
    1. Habitat complexity does not promote coexistence in a size-structured intraguild predation system (pages 55–63)

      Birte Reichstein, Arne Schröder, Lennart Persson and André M. De Roos

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02032.x

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      This study is a rare long-term multi-generation study on a vertebrate-system, integrating the role of intraguild predation, size-structure, and habitat complexity for coexistence in a size-structured IGP-system. In particular, it is shown that habitat complexity does not promote coexistence, because habitat complexity not only weakens predation but also equalizes competition.

    2. Beyond diversity: how nested predator effects control ecosystem functions (pages 64–71)

      Florian Dirk Schneider and Ulrich Brose

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12010

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      Predator species richness affects the lower trophic level. In a full factorial microcosm experiment the authors decomposed the interactive effects of three arthropod predators on a basal springtail population by linear modelling. Nested effects of two predators explain the level of springtail density and microbial biomass.

    3. Depletion of deep marine food patches forces divers to give up early (pages 72–83)

      Michele Thums, Corey J. A. Bradshaw, Michael D. Sumner, Judy M. Horsburgh and Mark A. Hindell

      Article first published online: 7 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02021.x

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      This approach has allowed for an assessment of patch quality and thus the ability to test optimal foraging models for a free-ranging diver. The results were consistent with the predictions of the marginal value theorem and provided support for a non-linear relationship between prey acquisition and time spent searching.

  6. Spatial ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. Reviews
    5. ‘How to…’ paper
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Population ecology
    9. Parasite and disease ecology
    10. Life histories
    11. Community ecology
    12. Climate ecology
    1. Geometrid outbreak waves travel across Europe (pages 84–95)

      Olle Tenow, Arne C. Nilssen, Helena Bylund, Rickard Pettersson, Andrea Battisti, Udo Bohn, Fabien Caroulle, Constantin Ciornei, György Csóka, Horst Delb, Willy De Prins, Milka Glavendekić, Yuri I. Gninenko, Boris Hrašovec, Dinka Matošević, Valentyna Meshkova, Leen Moraal, Constantin Netoiu, Juan Pajares, Vasily Rubtsov, Romica Tomescu and Irina Utkina

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02023.x

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      The continental scale 10-year cyclic outbreak waves described in the present paper and previously unknown are paralleled only by the classic travelling waves of Canadian lynx abundance. The findings substantiate wave theory and the authors suggest explanations of the start, propagation and direction of the waves. The results address several topical interdisciplinary theories.

    2. Environmental and individual drivers of animal movement patterns across a wide geographical gradient (pages 96–106)

      Tal Avgar, Anna Mosser, Glen S. Brown and John M. Fryxell

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02035.x

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      This study builds on our limited understanding of the effects of landscape heterogeneity on animal movement, finding that a great deal of observed variability in movement patterns across space and time can be attributed to local environment, while the remainder may be due to spatial population structure.

    3. A Palaearctic migratory raptor species tracks shifting prey availability within its wintering range in the Sahel (pages 107–120)

      Christiane Trierweiler, Wim C. Mullié, Rudi H. Drent, Klaus-Michael Exo, Jan Komdeur, Franz Bairlein, Abdoulaye Harouna, Marinus de Bakker and Ben J. Koks

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02036.x

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      Contrary to earlier hypotheses of random movements in the Sahel, this study shows that the migratory raptor Montagu's harrier visits distinct home ranges, is site-faithful and tracks seasonal changes in (grasshopper) food availability. Such itinerancy may be the rule rather than an exception in insectivorous birds wintering in African savannahs.

  7. Population ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. Reviews
    5. ‘How to…’ paper
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Population ecology
    9. Parasite and disease ecology
    10. Life histories
    11. Community ecology
    12. Climate ecology
    1. Contrasting effects of climatic variability on the demography of a trans-equatorial migratory seabird (pages 121–130)

      Meritxell Genovart, Ana Sanz-Aguilar, Albert Fernández-Chacón, Jose M. Igual, Roger Pradel, Manuela G. Forero and Daniel Oro

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02015.x

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      Using a novel multi-event modelling with data on the seabird Cory's shearwater, the authors show how climate influences several demographic parameters. Strikingly, adult survival, a very conservative life-history trait for long-lived organisms, varies with climatic conditions, likely by the frequency and severity of hurricanes during wintering and migration.

    2. Phenological mismatch strongly affects individual fitness but not population demography in a woodland passerine (pages 131–144)

      Thomas E. Reed, Stephanie Jenouvrier and Marcel E. Visser

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02020.x

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      Climate change is causing phenological mismatches in many species, but few studies simultaneously explore the demographic and evolutionary consequences. This study shows that mismatch effects on key population vital rates are weak, despite strong effects on individual relative fitness, illustrating how ecological and evolutionary processes can be decoupled.

    3. Habitat-independent spatial structure in populations of some forest birds in eastern North America (pages 145–154)

      Robert E. Ricklefs

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02024.x

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      This article describes the development of a novel protocol for identifying spatially structured deviations from population densities predicted by general climate and habitat characteristics, illustrating the application of this method with forest birds, and discussing implications for population processes. About one-quarter of the species considered exhibit distribution anomalies on the scale of 50–100 km.

    4. Re-evaluating the effect of harvesting regimes on Nile crocodiles using an integral projection model (pages 155–165)

      Kevin Wallace, Alison Leslie and Tim Coulson

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02027.x

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      This is the first example of crocodile population modelling using body size as a continuous character instead of the traditional ‘arbitrary’ size categories. The authors provide unique insights into the dynamics of a population of Nile crocodiles.

    5. Larval density dependence in Anopheles gambiae s.s., the major African vector of malaria (pages 166–174)

      Simon M. Muriu, Tim Coulson, Charles M. Mbogo and H. Charles J. Godfray

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12002

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      The paper concerns an experimental investigation of density dependence in the main vector of malaria in Africa. Strong and significant density dependence is shown in two different experiments. This is one of the very few studies to investigate larval ecology of a tropical vector in the field.

    6. Inferring animal population distributions from individual tracking data: theoretical insights and potential pitfalls (pages 175–181)

      Ricardo M. Holdo and R. Ryan Roach

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02031.x

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      The authors explore the challenges posed by the use of individual tracking data for inferring population-level space use. It is shown theoretically that the link between these two levels of analysis is not straightforward, and some of the issues that may give rise to potential challenges are identified.

  8. Parasite and disease ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. Reviews
    5. ‘How to…’ paper
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Population ecology
    9. Parasite and disease ecology
    10. Life histories
    11. Community ecology
    12. Climate ecology
    1. Biting injuries and transmission of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease (pages 182–190)

      Rodrigo K. Hamede, Hamish McCallum and Menna Jones

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02025.x

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      DFTD is an emerging infectious cancer affecting the largest extant marsupial carnivore. This study has used empirical data from two distinctive genetic populations to understand behaviours directly associated with infection risk and disease transmission events. The study provides a new window of opportunities for managing this emergent and extinction-threatening disease.

    2. Prevalence of infection as a predictor of multiple genotype infection frequency in parasites with multiple-host life cycle (pages 191–200)

      Katja-Riikka Louhi, Anssi Karvonen, Christian Rellstab, Risto Louhi and Jukka Jokela

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02028.x

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      Studies of MGIs in replicated natural populations are notoriously rare and there are no studies addressing these questions at a global scale; therefore, this study will have broad interest to a large community of biologists interested in host-parasite interactions, evolution of virulence and parasite transmission dynamics.

  9. Life histories

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. Reviews
    5. ‘How to…’ paper
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Population ecology
    9. Parasite and disease ecology
    10. Life histories
    11. Community ecology
    12. Climate ecology
    1. Effects of temperature and food quality on age and size at maturity in ectotherms: an experimental test with Atlantic salmon (pages 201–210)

      Bror Jonsson, Nina Jonsson and Anders G. Finstad

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02022.x

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      When an organism will attain maturity is a fundamental question in population ecology. In this study, increased growth rate before maturation onset decreased age and therefore size at maturity, but there was no contrasting effect of high temperature and high feeding rate. The results have relevance to studies of climate change effects on wild fish.

    2. Predicting dispersal distance in mammals: a trait-based approach (pages 211–221)

      Sarah Whitmee and C. David L. Orme

      Article first published online: 23 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02030.x

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      This manuscript identifies and tests whether life history traits can be used to predict dispersal distance, within a phylogenetic framework. Findings can be extended to predict distances for mammals where empirical data is unavailable, and thus help parameterise many ecological models (e.g. models of species range movement under climate change).

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      The adaptive value of morphological, behavioural and life-history traits in reproductive female wolves (pages 222–234)

      Daniel R. Stahler, Daniel R. MacNulty, Robert K. Wayne, Bridgett vonHoldt and Douglas W. Smith

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02039.x

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      This study uses 14 years of data from a long-term study of wolves in Yellowstone National Park to detail the little known relative influence of morphological, behavioural and life-history traits on reproduction, particularly in the context of environmental conditions that determine their adaptive value.

    4. Age-dependent trade-offs between immunity and male, but not female, reproduction (pages 235–244)

      Kathryn B. McNamara, Emile van Lieshout, Therésa M. Jones and Leigh W. Simmons

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02018.x

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      Trade-offs between immune function and reproduction typically focus on adults, yet the juvenile period is for many species a protracted period when individuals acquire resources for reproduction and are highly vulnerable to parasites and pathogens. The authors demonstrate that the age at juvenile immune challenge alters adult reproductive trade-offs.

    5. The ecological economics of kleptoparasitism: pay-offs from self-foraging versus kleptoparasitism (pages 245–255)

      Tom P. Flower, Matthew F. Child and Amanda R. Ridley

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02026.x

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      Many species steal food (kleptoparasitism), but the benefits of this behaviour remain unclear. The authors show that kleptoparasitism enables fork-tailed drongos to exploit a new foraging niche, which is principally beneficial in cold conditions when payoffs from alternate foraging strategies decline. This research provides insight into the evolution of kleptoparasitism.

  10. Community ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. Reviews
    5. ‘How to…’ paper
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Population ecology
    9. Parasite and disease ecology
    10. Life histories
    11. Community ecology
    12. Climate ecology
    1. Seasonal variation in competition and coexistence of Aedes mosquitoes: stabilizing effects of egg mortality or equalizing effects of resources? (pages 256–265)

      Paul A. O'Neal and Steven A. Juliano

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02017.x

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      This paper examines the impacts of seasonal fluctuations of environmental conditions on coexistence of two competing species. Unlike most studies dealing with similar topics, the discussion of fluctuations of environmental conditions is framed in terms of both stabilizing and equalizing effects.

    2. Environmental species sorting dominates forest-bird community assembly across scales (pages 266–274)

      Korhan Özkan, Jens-Christian Svenning and Erik Jeppesen

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02019.x

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      The authors report a novel cross-scale comprehensive analysis of bird metacommunity structure, providing a more integrative perspective on the driving factors than any previous study. They find that environmental sorting predominates bird community assembly across scales, even linking it to assemblage structure for the whole Western Palaearctic biogeographic region.

  11. Climate ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. Reviews
    5. ‘How to…’ paper
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Population ecology
    9. Parasite and disease ecology
    10. Life histories
    11. Community ecology
    12. Climate ecology
    1. You have free access to this content
      Each life stage matters: the importance of assessing the response to climate change over the complete life cycle in butterflies (pages 275–285)

      Viktoriia Radchuk, Camille Turlure and Nicolas Schtickzelle

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02029.x

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      The authors assess the impact of temperature, one of the key climate change drivers, on each life stage of a butterfly life cycle and integrate the response over the complete life cycle in a deterministic matrix table. They demonstrate that failing to incorporate each life stage can result in misleading conclusions.

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