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Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 82 Issue 2

March 2013

Volume 82, Issue 2

Pages 287–494

  1. In Focus

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Spatial ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Macroecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Community ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
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      Who's hot and who's not: ocean warming alters species dominance through competitive displacement (pages 287–289)

      Ivan Nagelkerken and Stephen D. Simpson

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12053

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      This ‘In Focus’ article examines the study by Milazzo et al., highlighting the complexity of predicting climate change effects on future marine community faunal communities.

  2. Spatial ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Spatial ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Macroecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Community ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
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      Reciprocal modulation of internal and external factors determines individual movements (pages 290–300)

      Jodie Martin, Bram van Moorter, Eloy Revilla, Pierrick Blanchard, Stéphane Dray, Pierre-Yves Quenette, Dominique Allainé and Jon E. Swenson

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02038.x

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      Using the Scandinavian brown bear as a model, the authors provide insights on the complex processes of fine-scale individual movements, showing that both internal and external factors must be integrated together in movement analyses to avoid context dependent inferences. The findings open new insights on the balance between the effects of internal and external factors and how this can affect behavioural responses to landscape variability.

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      The influence of winter severity, predation and senescence on moose habitat use (pages 301–309)

      Robert A. Montgomery, John A. Vucetich, Rolf O. Peterson, Gary J. Roloff and Kelly F. Millenbah

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12000

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      This study connects life history state (e.g. senescence) and habitat use, an influence manifest in population-level processes. It is the first to demonstrate the effect of interannual variation in winter severity on habitat use, and the authors show how predation risk in the preceding year influences habitat use in the current year.

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      Vegetation dynamics drive segregation by body size in Galapagos tortoises migrating across altitudinal gradients (pages 310–321)

      Stephen Blake, Charles B. Yackulic, Fredy Cabrera, Washington Tapia, James P. Gibbs, Franz Kümmeth and Martin Wikelski

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12020

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      The authors demonstrate stereotypic migration by Galapagos tortoises and identify vegetation dynamics as the principle driver. Migration is size-biased toward larger individuals, which, with a lack of sex-based behavioural differences distinguishes this system from other partial migratory systems. This work showcases a good model system for studying the causes and consequences of migration.

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      Disrupted fine-scale population processes in fragmented landscapes despite large-scale genetic connectivity for a widespread and common cooperative breeder: the superb fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) (pages 322–333)

      Katherine A. Harrisson, Alexandra Pavlova, J. Nevil Amos, Naoko Takeuchi, Alan Lill, James Q. Radford and Paul Sunnucks

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12007

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      Although loss of structural connectivity does not appear to impede gene flow at larger spatial scales in this study, fragmentation is shown to adversely affect fine-scale population processes and may contribute to the decline of superb fairy-wrens in fragmented landscapes. The results contribute to our understanding of how habitat fragmentation and landscape structure affect population processes such as gene flow.

  3. Population ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Spatial ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Macroecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Community ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
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      Agricultural irrigation mediates climatic effects and density dependence in population dynamics of Chinese striped hamster in North China Plain (pages 334–344)

      Chuan Yan, Lei Xu, Tongqin Xu, Xiaoping Cao, Fusheng Wang, Shuqing Wang, Shoushen Hao, Hefang Yang and Zhibin Zhang

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02037.x

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      Warmer weather is shown to increase population sizes in non-breeding seasons, but this effect is counteracted by the negative effect of flood irrigation in breeding seasons. Agricultural activity is found to alter density dependence in breeding seasons. The results indicate that we need to consider anthropogenic disturbance as an integral component of population responses to climate change.

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      Experimentally testing the accuracy of an extinction estimator: Solow's optimal linear estimation model (pages 345–354)

      Christopher F. Clements, Nicholas T. Worsfold, Philip H. Warren, Ben Collen, Nick Clark, Tim M. Blackburn and Owen L. Petchey

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12005

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      Novel use of microcosm data is utilised to investigate the effects of observer and system specific factors on the predictive accuracy of an extinction predictor. These are widely used but poorly tested, yet testing the accuracy of these predictors, and what factors affect this, is vital when considering a species’ extinction status.

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      No need for disease: testing extinction hypotheses for the thylacine using multi-species metamodels (pages 355–364)

      Thomas A. A. Prowse, Christopher N. Johnson, Robert C. Lacy, Corey J. A. Bradshaw, John P. Pollak, Michael J. Watts and Barry W. Brook

      Version of Record online: 24 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12029

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      Contrary to popular and scientific consensus, this study finds that the extinction of the Tasmanian thylacine can be explained by well-documented, European-imposed pressures, without invoking an hypothetical disease as an additional cause.

  4. Macroecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Spatial ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Macroecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Community ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
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      Global diversity patterns and cross-taxa convergence in freshwater systems (pages 365–376)

      Clement Tisseuil, Jean-François Cornu, Olivier Beauchard, Sebastien Brosse, William Darwall, Robert Holland, Bernard Hugueny, Pablo A. Tedesco and Thierry Oberdorff

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12018

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      The authors analyse, for the first time, the global distribution of five freshwater taxa, identifying a number of recurrent patterns driven by some common environmental factors. The results support the notion that climate per se, productivity, area and history all play an important role in explaining global freshwater diversity patterns.

  5. Evolutionary ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Spatial ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Macroecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Community ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
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      Risk-sensitive allocation in seasonal dynamics of fat and protein reserves in a long-lived mammal (pages 377–388)

      Kevin L. Monteith, Thomas R. Stephenson, Vernon C. Bleich, Mary M. Conner, Becky M. Pierce and R. Terry Bowyer

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12016

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      Using a long-term, individual-based study, the authors reveal linkages between nutrition and life history of a long-lived mammal relative to allocation of resources to reproduction and maintenance. This work debunks a number of suppositions regarding the seasonal nutritional ecology of ruminants.

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      Evidence of long-term structured cuckoo parasitism on individual magpie hosts (pages 389–398)

      Mercedes Molina-Morales, Juan Gabriel Martínez, David Martín-Gálvez, Deborah A. Dawson, Juan Rodríguez-Ruiz, Terry Burke and Jesús M. Avilés

      Version of Record online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12022

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      This paper provides the first empirical evidence for the existence of a long-term structured pattern of cuckoo parasitism in a host, describing a 5-year individual-based study in a population exposed to variable level of parasitism. The study is the first to identify differences in reproductive and defensive host traits between individuals suffering different levels of repeated parasitism.

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      Quantitative genetics of sexual display, ejaculate quality and size in a lekking species (pages 399–407)

      Rémi Chargé, Céline Teplitsky, Yves Hingrat, Michel Saint Jalme, Frédéric Lacroix and Gabriele Sorci

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12023

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      The authors estimate heritabilities and genetic correlations among traits involved in pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection in a lekking bird species, the houbara bustard. This is the first study reporting a positive genetic correlation between ejaculate size and courtship display.

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      Compensation and additivity of anthropogenic mortality: life-history effects and review of methods (pages 408–417)

      Guillaume Péron

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12014

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      This article presents a new approach to an old topic, using a novel quantitative tool to identify where a natural population is on the demographic compensation- additivity continuum and hence what its ability to sustain exploitation and predation is. It provides the first quantitative evidence for life history effects on the level of compensation for anthropogenic mortality.

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      Pigments versus structure: examining the mechanism of age-dependent change in a carotenoid-based colour (pages 418–428)

      Simon R. Evans and Ben C. Sheldon

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12008

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      This study investigates the increase in coloration accompanying the first- to second-year moult transition of great tits, finding that age-dependence of plumage coloration is driven almost exclusively by within-individual effects in the first 2 years of life. The results highlight the utility of wavelength-specific analyses in determining the mechanisms underlying changes in expression of composite colour traits.

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      Predation drives interpopulation differences in parental care expression (pages 429–437)

      Wen-San Huang, Si-Min Lin, Sylvain Dubey and David A. Pike

      Version of Record online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12015

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      Studying a unique long-tailed skink population, the authors show that local ecological factors can influence the evolution of parental care in a single population of a widespread species, and that the expression of parental care can be plastic. This questions a widely held assumption that whether or not parental care is expressed within a single species is an evolved, fixed trait.

  6. Community ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Spatial ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Macroecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Community ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
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      Distinguishing between direct and indirect effects of predators in complex ecosystems (pages 438–448)

      Nessa E. O'Connor, Mark C. Emmerson, Tasman P. Crowe and Ian Donohue

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12001

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      This is the first study to manipulate two predator species and two groups of their prey in the field, identifying direct and indirect effects of predators on algal assemblages and showing that non-trophic and trophic interactions must be considered simultaneously to understand the functional role of consumers for ecosystems.

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      Metacommunity structure in a small boreal stream network (pages 449–458)

      Emma Göthe, David G. Angeler and Leonard Sandin

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12004

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      To date, this is the first study to investigate seasonal changes in stream metacommunity structure, to simultaneously assess the importance of three relevant dispersal processes for stream organisms, and to attempt to elucidate the underlying dispersal mechanisms (i.e. mass-effects vs. dispersal limitation) behind the spatial signals in stream networks.

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      Elk herbivory alters small mammal assemblages in high-elevation drainages (pages 459–467)

      Elliott W. R. Parsons, John L. Maron and Thomas E. Martin

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12009

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      Changes in elk-plant interactions, likely due to climate changes, are found to have influenced an entire assemblage of co-occurring small mammals. This work is novel because few studies have examined the potential for indirect effects arising from climate-driven changes in plant-animal interactions.

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      Climate change exacerbates interspecific interactions in sympatric coastal fishes (pages 468–477)

      Marco Milazzo, Simone Mirto, Paolo Domenici and Michele Gristina

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02034.x

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      The authors demonstrate the role and the relative importance of pair-wise species interactions (a warm-water fish vs a cool-water ecological antagonist) on the observed changes in response to warming conditions. The study is novel in considering inter-specific interactions and habitat selection within the same thermal environment, and has broad implications for predictive models of climate change.

  7. Behavioural ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Spatial ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Macroecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Community ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
    1. You have free access to this content
      Shedding light on light: benefits of anthropogenic illumination to a nocturnally foraging shorebird (pages 478–485)

      Ross G. Dwyer, Stuart Bearhop, Hamish A. Campbell and David M. Bryant

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12012

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      For the first time, satellite imagery is combined with telemetry data to reveal the effect of lighting on the timing and distribution of foraging opportunities in a wild animal. This is important since coastal development is increasing worldwide, yet the impact of the illumination of these areas on individual foraging strategies remains unknown.

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      Ecological and demographic correlates of helping behaviour in a cooperatively breeding bird (pages 486–494)

      Ben J. Hatchwell, Stuart P. Sharp, Andrew P. Beckerman and Jessica Meade

      Version of Record online: 24 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12017

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      Using a long-term data set, the authors investigate potential ecological and demographic correlates of variation in helping behaviour in a cooperatively breeding bird, the long-tailed tit. They identify two novel factors that predict the degree of helping: nest predation rate and length of the breeding season.

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