Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 82 Issue 3

May 2013

Volume 82, Issue 3

Pages 495–715

  1. In Focus

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Parasite and disease ecology
    5. Life histories
    6. Climate ecology
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Population ecology
    10. Evolutionary ecology
    11. Physiological ecology
    12. Demography
    13. Behavioural ecology
    1. You have free access to this content
      Inadvertent consequences of fishing: the case of the sex-changing shrimp (pages 495–497)

      Isabelle M. Côté

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12074

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      This ‘In Focus’ article examines the study by Chiba et al., highlighting the importance of considering potentially maladaptive plastic responses of harvested animals in selective fishing environments in efforts to conserve wild animal resources.

  2. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Parasite and disease ecology
    5. Life histories
    6. Climate ecology
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Population ecology
    10. Evolutionary ecology
    11. Physiological ecology
    12. Demography
    13. Behavioural ecology
    1. You have free access to this content
      Mechanistic models of animal migration behaviour – their diversity, structure and use (pages 498–508)

      Silke Bauer and Marcel Klaassen

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12054

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      Animal migration has relevance to fundamental and many applied ecological questions. Theoretical methods can importantly contribute to their answers and therefore, we characterise the existing mechanistic modelling approaches, their structure and assumptions and review their use across taxa and research themes.

  3. Parasite and disease ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Parasite and disease ecology
    5. Life histories
    6. Climate ecology
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Population ecology
    10. Evolutionary ecology
    11. Physiological ecology
    12. Demography
    13. Behavioural ecology
    1. Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems (pages 509–517)

      Daniel L. Preston, Sarah A. Orlofske, Jason P. Lambden and Pieter T. J. Johnson

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12030

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      The roles of parasites in ecosystems are frequently overlooked, despite the fact that parasitism is the most common animal lifestyle. Here, the authors integrate trematode parasites into measurements of animal biomass in pond ecosystems and find that parasites make large direct energetic contributions, rivalling that of the most abundant free-living groups.

    2. Spatio-temporal dynamics of pneumonia in bighorn sheep (pages 518–528)

      E. Frances Cassirer, Raina K. Plowright, Kezia R. Manlove, Paul C. Cross, Andrew P. Dobson, Kathleen A. Potter and Peter J. Hudson

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12031

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      This paper provides a description and analysis of long term patterns of pneumonia in bighorn sheep that have previously been unreported, anecdotal, or described with limited data. Importantly, this analysis reveals some of the underlying biological processes driving the disease.

  4. Life histories

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Parasite and disease ecology
    5. Life histories
    6. Climate ecology
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Population ecology
    10. Evolutionary ecology
    11. Physiological ecology
    12. Demography
    13. Behavioural ecology
    1. Plastic larval development in a butterfly has complex environmental and genetic causes and consequences for population dynamics (pages 529–539)

      Marjo Saastamoinen, Suvi Ikonen, Swee C. Wong, Rainer Lehtonen and Ilkka Hanski

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12034

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      A central goal of population and evolutionary biology is to develop a mechanistic understanding of how environmental variation affects individual fitness and population and evolutionary dynamics in natural populations. This study makes an important contribution in this context in indicating the importance of developmental plasticity in individual development and how this may interact with population dynamics.

    2. Colony life history and lifetime reproductive success of red harvester ant colonies (pages 540–550)

      Krista K. Ingram, Anna Pilko, Jeffrey Heer and Deborah M. Gordon

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12036

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      This study uses microsatellite variation to identify parent-offspring pairs in a population of harvester ant colonies. It is the first measure of a life table and of colony lifetime reproductive success in a population of social insect colonies, opening the way for future studies of the relation between phenotypic variation and reproductive success.

  5. Climate ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Parasite and disease ecology
    5. Life histories
    6. Climate ecology
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Population ecology
    10. Evolutionary ecology
    11. Physiological ecology
    12. Demography
    13. Behavioural ecology
    1. Impact of climate change on communities: revealing species' contribution (pages 551–561)

      Catherine M. Davey, Vincent Devictor, Niclas Jonzén, Åke Lindström and Henrik G. Smith

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12035

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      The authors use a novel framework to describe the significant changes to the structure of bird communities resulting from climate change and identify the individual species driving the community changes. This paper is the first to combine a community and species approach to this problem.

  6. Spatial ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Parasite and disease ecology
    5. Life histories
    6. Climate ecology
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Population ecology
    10. Evolutionary ecology
    11. Physiological ecology
    12. Demography
    13. Behavioural ecology
    1. Functional diversity among seed dispersal kernels generated by carnivorous mammals (pages 562–571)

      Juan P. González-Varo, José V. López-Bao and José Guitián

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12024

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      The authors measure, for the first time, the whole range of real seed dispersal distances generated by two widespread carnivores that play an essential role in many ecosystems as frugivores and seed dispersers. This study provides the first empirical evidence of functional diversity among seed dispersal kernels generated by carnivorous mammals.

    2. Inferring spatial memory and spatiotemporal scaling from GPS data: comparing red deer Cervus elaphus movements with simulation models (pages 572–586)

      Arild O. Gautestad, Leif E. Loe and Atle Mysterud

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12027

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      Animal space use is fundamental to understanding several ecological processes, but this field is split into separate areas without much productive contact. The aim here is to achieve one such bridge by comparing GPS-data from red deer with theoretical movement models with known underlying behavioural mechanisms and statistical properties.

    3. Spatial spread of Eurasian beavers in river networks: a comparison of range expansion rates (pages 587–597)

      Vojtěch Barták, Aleš Vorel, Petra Šímová and Vladimír Puš

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12040

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      Classical methods for measuring the rate of populatoin spatial spread are designed for species dispersing over one or two dimensional space. In this paper, a novel methodology is suggested for measuring the rate of spread in river networks, based on representing a river network by means of a weighted graph.

  7. Trophic interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Parasite and disease ecology
    5. Life histories
    6. Climate ecology
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Population ecology
    10. Evolutionary ecology
    11. Physiological ecology
    12. Demography
    13. Behavioural ecology
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      Top-down control of prey increases with drying disturbance in ponds: a consequence of non-consumptive interactions? (pages 598–607)

      Hamish S. Greig, Scott A. Wissinger and Angus R. McIntosh

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12042

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      Here it is shown that non-consumptive interactions in the diverse predator guilds of physically benign habitats reduce predation rates, resulting in an unexpected increase in top-down control with increasing disturbance. Therefore, considering changes in food-web complexity, especially the non-consumptive effects of top predators, is essential to understand species interactions across environmental gradients.

  8. Population ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Parasite and disease ecology
    5. Life histories
    6. Climate ecology
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Population ecology
    10. Evolutionary ecology
    11. Physiological ecology
    12. Demography
    13. Behavioural ecology
    1. A cat's tale: the impact of genetic restoration on Florida panther population dynamics and persistence (pages 608–620)

      Jeffrey A. Hostetler, David P. Onorato, Deborah Jansen and Madan K. Oli

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12033

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      This study unambiguously demonstrates that genetic restoration reversed the declining trend of a small, inbred population of the endangered Florida panther. Further, the authors show that the panther population would have continued to decline and faced a substantial risk of extinction if genetic restoration initiative had not been implemented.

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      Time-lag in extinction dynamics in experimental populations: evidence for a genetic Allee effect? (pages 621–631)

      Elodie Vercken, Flora Vincent, Ludovic Mailleret, Nicolas Ris, Elisabeth Tabone and Xavier Fauvergue

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12051

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      This paper reports the first empirical demonstration of a positive effect of propagule pressure in interaction with genetic background on population persistence in a laboratory system. This paper also reports for the first time intrinsic differences in demographic variance between geographic strains of the same species.

  9. Evolutionary ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Parasite and disease ecology
    5. Life histories
    6. Climate ecology
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Population ecology
    10. Evolutionary ecology
    11. Physiological ecology
    12. Demography
    13. Behavioural ecology
    1. You have free access to this content
      Maladaptive sex ratio adjustment by a sex-changing shrimp in selective-fishing environments (pages 632–641)

      Susumu Chiba, Kenji Yoshino, Minoru Kanaiwa, Toshifumi Kawajiri and Seiji Goshima

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12006

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      This paper provide the first concrete evidence of adult sex ratio adjustment by a pandalid shrimp, a group that has been treated as a model in the sex allocation theory, in response to selective fishing. This sex ratio plasticity in response to selective harvesting may have negative consequences for conservation.

    2. The evolutionary ecology of dwarfism in three-spined sticklebacks (pages 642–652)

      Andrew D. C. MacColl, Aliya El Nagar and Job de Roij

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12028

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      Using intra-species variation in three-spined sticklebacks, the authors show that dwarfism evolves rapidly in resource poor lakes in the absence of smaller competitors. This is one of the first studies to examine in detail the ecological correlates of dwarfism within a species, and the first to do so in fish.

    3. Environment-mediated morph-linked immune and life-history responses in the aposematic wood tiger moth (pages 653–662)

      Ossi Nokelainen, Carita Lindstedt and Johanna Mappes

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12037

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      Maintenance of colour polymorphism is particularly problematic in aposematic species, because selection should favour monomorphic warning coloration. Here the authors show that aposematic wood tiger moth expresses differential morph-linked immune responses in high densities. This can favour morphs in their respective natural environment, and facilitate maintenance of colour polymorphism.

    4. Optimal temperature range of a plastic species, Drosophila simulans (pages 663–672)

      Christopher J. Austin and Amanda J. Moehring

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12041

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      Some species use phenotypic plasticity (rather than genetic adaptation) to survive shifting environments. (i) This is the first study to examine the relative fitness of a ‘plastic’ species. (ii) Even knowing this species is ‘plastic,’ we found a shockingly wide range of temperatures at which this species performs optimally.

  10. Physiological ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Parasite and disease ecology
    5. Life histories
    6. Climate ecology
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Population ecology
    10. Evolutionary ecology
    11. Physiological ecology
    12. Demography
    13. Behavioural ecology
    1. Fat provisioning in winter impairs egg production during the following spring: a landscape-scale study of blue tits (pages 673–682)

      Kate E. Plummer, Stuart Bearhop, David I. Leech, Dan E. Chamberlain and Jonathan D. Blount

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12025

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      Provisioning of food to wild birds is widespread but its ecological impacts are poorly understood. The authors show that winter provisioning with fat results in smaller relative yolk mass and reduced yolk carotenoid concentrations in early breeders, while these effects are not seen in birds provisioned with fat-plus-vitamin E. The results highlight how the ecological impacts of provisioning can depend on the nutritional profile of foods.

  11. Demography

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Parasite and disease ecology
    5. Life histories
    6. Climate ecology
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Population ecology
    10. Evolutionary ecology
    11. Physiological ecology
    12. Demography
    13. Behavioural ecology
    1. Predators, alternative prey and climate influence annual breeding success of a long-lived sea duck (pages 683–693)

      David T. Iles, Robert F. Rockwell, Paul Matulonis, Gregory J. Robertson, Kenneth F. Abraham, J. Chris Davies and David. N. Koons

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12038

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      The authors use a long-term study of sea duck breeding ecology to show that a precipitous increase in the abundance of an alternative prey species, driven by human land-use change in mid-continent North America, has had dramatic impacts on the breeding success of a sub-Arctic seabird through effects on shared predators.

  12. Behavioural ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Parasite and disease ecology
    5. Life histories
    6. Climate ecology
    7. Spatial ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Population ecology
    10. Evolutionary ecology
    11. Physiological ecology
    12. Demography
    13. Behavioural ecology
    1. Same size – same niche? Foraging niche separation between sympatric juvenile Galapagos sea lions and adult Galapagos fur seals (pages 694–706)

      Jana W. E. Jeglinski, Kimberley T. Goetz, Christiane Werner, Daniel P. Costa and Fritz Trillmich

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12019

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      Using biologging methodology (GPS TDR data) and stable isotope analysis, this study addresses foraging niche competition of juvenile animals with similar-sized adults of a sympatric species. Such ecological interactions have received little attention, yet juvenile foraging success and survival are key factors influencing population dynamics.

    2. Comparison of the effects of artificial and natural barriers on large African carnivores: Implications for interspecific relationships and connectivity (pages 707–715)

      Gabriele Cozzi, Femke Broekhuis, J. Weldon McNutt and Bernhard Schmid

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12039

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      The manner in which animals respond to risk is crucial in understanding species coexistence. Here the authors show that avoidance of more dominant predators by cheetahs in northern Botswana is reactive rather than predictive – a strategy that could be key in enabling competing species to coexist in an ecosystem where risks are widespread and recurrent.

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