Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 82 Issue 4

July 2013

Volume 82, Issue 4

Pages 717–921

  1. In Focus

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Spatial ecology
    6. Population ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Demography
    1. You have free access to this content
      Fear begets function in the ‘brown’ world of detrital food webs (pages 717–720)

      Elizabeth Nichols

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12099

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      This ‘In Focus’ article highlights the study by Zhao et al., in this issue, which demonstrates how predators can affect plant growth via changes in detrivore behaviour in a detritus food web.

  2. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Spatial ecology
    6. Population ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Demography
    1. You have free access to this content
      Species diversity and community similarity in fluctuating environments: parametric approaches using species abundance distributions (pages 721–738)

      Bernt-Erik Sæther, Steinar Engen and Vidar Grøtan

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12068

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      This is the first comprehensive review of how to analyse community dynamics in space and time using specific species abundance models. The authors argue for a parametric approach in studies of community structure and organization, and assume an underlying lognormal form of the species abundance distribution.

  3. Trophic interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Spatial ecology
    6. Population ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Demography
    1. Effects of tree species richness and composition on moose winter browsing damage and foraging selectivity: an experimental study (pages 739–748)

      Harriet T. Milligan and Julia Koricheva

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12049

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      This is one of the first large-scale experiments examining effects of forest diversity on mammalian browsing under realistic natural conditions. Strong tree species richness and species composition effects found in this study indicate that plant associational effects need to be incorporated into optimal foraging theory predicting patterns of mammalian browsing.

    2. Predatory beetles facilitate plant growth by driving earthworms to lower soil layers (pages 749–758)

      Chuan Zhao, John N. Griffin, Xinwei Wu and Shucun Sun

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12058

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      The results of this study show that non-consumptive interactions can completely reverse the sign of cascading species interactions as predicted by traditional theory predicated on consumptive predator-prey interactions. This work adds a completely novel aspect to the highly topical issue of how predators influence plants and ultimately ecosystem functioning in terrestrial ecosystems.

  4. Spatial ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Spatial ecology
    6. Population ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Demography
    1. Unsuitable habitat patches lead to severe underestimation of dynamics and gene flow in a zooplankton metapopulation (pages 759–769)

      Dieter Ebert, Jürgen W. Hottinger and V. Ilmari Pajunen

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12044

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      Migration among patches in a metapopulation may be limited by migrants or by patch quality. In an intensively studied Daphnia metapopulation, the authors reveal that patch quality is a strongly limiting factor. Actual migration rates are 3–5 times higher than previously thought, making the entire metapopulation much more dynamic than previous studies assumed.

    2. Understanding scales of movement: animals ride waves and ripples of environmental change (pages 770–780)

      Bram van Moorter, Nils Bunnefeld, Manuela Panzacchi, Christer M. Rolandsen, Erling J. Solberg and Bernt-Erik Sæther

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12045

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      Despite the increased recognition of scale in ecology, different scales of movement are often studied separately. Here, the authors develop theoretical predictions and a novel approach to study the role of environment to explain spatiotemporal scales of movement. They test these predictions against the movements of moose in Norway.

    3. Patterns of bird functional diversity on land-bridge island fragments (pages 781–790)

      Zhifeng Ding, Kenneth J. Feeley, Yanping Wang, Robin J. Pakeman and Ping Ding

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12046

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      This paper focuses on the effects of habitat fragmentation on bird functional diversity – a question that has remained relatively poorly understood, despite its importance to ecological functioning in fragmented habitats. The findings, which extend the classical theory of island biogeography, support the need for these effects to be explicitly considered in reserve design.

    4. Assignment tests, telemetry and tag-recapture data converge to identify natal origins of leatherback turtles foraging in Atlantic Canadian waters (pages 791–803)

      Kelly R. Stewart, Michael C. James, Suzanne Roden and Peter H. Dutton

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12056

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      This study involves multiple methods to assign natal origins to foraging leatherback turtles off the coast of eastern Canada. There are very few papers to date that use telemetry, tags and genetics in combination to do this for any species. This work highlights the importance of long-term monitoring and tagging programs in nesting and high-use foraging areas, and may help to identify where international recovery efforts may be most effective.

  5. Population ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Spatial ecology
    6. Population ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Demography
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Faltering lemming cycles reduce productivity and population size of a migratory Arctic goose species (pages 804–813)

      Bart A. Nolet, Silke Bauer, Nicole Feige, Yakov I. Kokorev, Igor Yu. Popov and Barwolt S. Ebbinge

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12060

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      Lemmings have long been known to indirectly affect productivity of Arctic-nesting birds, but here the authors present the first evidence for effects of lemming abundance on population size of a migratory bird species. The results illustrate the wider negative impacts of collapsing lemming cycles in several northern regions ascribed to winter climate changes.

    2. Indirect and mitigated effects of pulsed resources on the population dynamics of a northern rodent (pages 814–825)

      Nikhil Lobo and John S. Millar

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12062

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      This paper provides insights on interspecific competition between pre- and post-dispersal consumers, an interaction that has received little attention in the dynamic consumer-resource pulse literature. The results suggest a novel hypothesis for an important multi-trophic interaction in this system that is ideal for further large-scale, integrative, multi-disciplinary ecosystem studies.

  6. Life histories

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Spatial ecology
    6. Population ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Demography
    1. Who wears the pants in a mute swan pair? Deciphering the effects of male and female age and identity on breeding success (pages 826–835)

      Josh R. Auld, Christopher M. Perrins and Anne Charmantier

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12043

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      This paper takes advantage of a long-term dataset from a wild population of swans to examine the role of male identity and life history in what are typically considered to be female traits. The authors demonstrate that both the identity and age of the male play a role in breeding success.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Male reproductive strategy explains spatiotemporal segregation in brown bears (pages 836–845)

      Sam M.J.G. Steyaert, Jonas Kindberg, Jon E. Swenson and Andreas Zedrosser

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12055

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      The authors quantify spatiotemporal segregation between various reproductive classes of brown bears using resource selection modelling. They find that sexually selected infanticide best explains the observed segregation, and that infanticide risk avoidance can be a very complex and fine scaled spatiotemporal mechanism. The results indicate that females with dependent young probably use human shields to lower the risk for infanticide.

  7. Evolutionary ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Spatial ecology
    6. Population ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Demography
    1. A direct physiological trade-off between personal and social immunity (pages 846–853)

      Sheena C. Cotter, Joanne E. Littlefair, Peter J. Grantham and Rebecca M. Kilner

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12047

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      Personal immunity protects the survival component of fitness whilst social immunity protects inclusive fitness by providing immunity to kin. By stimulating the personal immune response and recording the down-regulation in the social immune response, the authors provide the first evidence for a direct physiological trade-off between these two fitness-related traits.

    2. The early toad gets the worm: cane toads at an invasion front benefit from higher prey availability (pages 854–862)

      Gregory P. Brown, Crystal Kelehear and Richard Shine

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12048

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      Here the authors show that nutritional benefits to individuals in a cane toad invasion vanguard may have conferred a selective advantage to accelerated dispersal in this system. It is important to understand processes occurring at the expanding range edge in a world where so many populations are expanding, such as invasive species, or native species driven by climate-change-induced shifts in habitat.

    3. Female-biased obligate strategies in a partially migratory population (pages 863–871)

      Adam M. Fudickar, Andreas Schmidt, Michaela Hau, Michael Quetting and Jesko Partecke

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12052

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      Using state-of-the-art tracking techniques to observe the movements of individuals from a partially migratory songbird population year-round in combination with measures of hormonal and energetic state, we provide the most detailed picture of partial migration in a free-living population.

    4. Decomposing variation in male reproductive success: age-specific variances and covariances through extra-pair and within-pair reproduction (pages 872–883)

      Christophe Lebigre, Peter Arcese and Jane M. Reid

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12063

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      This study provides the first comprehensive quantification of age-specific (co)variances in reproductive success achieved through different routes in a wild population. The authors demonstrate substantial variation in the contributions of such (co)variances to the total variance in lifetime reproductive success, and that extra-pair reproduction can alter the (co)variance structure of age-specific life-histories.

    5. Does cooperation increase helpers' later success as breeders? A test of the skills hypothesis in the cooperatively displaying lance-tailed manakin (pages 884–893)

      Emily H. DuVal

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12057

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      This study of lance-tailed manakins provides the first information on the detailed effects of cooperative experience on later breeding success for any cooperatively displaying species. It also may represent the strongest test to date of the “skills hypothesis” for cooperative behaviour-proposing that individuals cooperate to gain skills that improve later breeding success - which has not been subjected to extensive rigorous testing.

    6. How do foragers decide when to leave a patch? A test of alternative models under natural and experimental conditions (pages 894–902)

      Harry H. Marshall, Alecia J. Carter, Alexandra Ashford, J. Marcus Rowcliffe and Guy Cowlishaw

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12089

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      This paper provides rare empirical tests of competing models of patch-departure decisions in natural and field-experimental foraging conditions. It shows that foragers' patch-departure decisions may depend on the characteristics of the environment, and that in some environments simpler models can provide a good description of this behaviour. Photo by Harry Marshall/ZSL Tsaobis Baboon Project.

  8. Demography

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Review
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Spatial ecology
    6. Population ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Demography
    1. Top-down and bottom-up influences on demographic rates of Antarctic fur seals Arctocephalus gazella (pages 903–911)

      Lisa K. Schwarz, Michael E. Goebel, Daniel P. Costa and A. Marm Kilpatrick

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12059

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      While many studies of polar bird and mammalian species focus on the bottom-up effects of environmental change, impacts of predation are often overlooked. Although adult demographic rates are correlated with environmental variability, predation on pups appears to drive the current decline of an Antarctic fur seal colony.

    2. Migration phenology and seasonal fidelity of an Arctic marine predator in relation to sea ice dynamics (pages 912–921)

      Seth G. Cherry, Andrew E. Derocher, Gregory W. Thiemann and Nicholas J. Lunn

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12050

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      Understanding the relationship between landscape-scale phenological events and migratory patterns of wide-ranging species is an important aspect of quantifying and predicting the effects of global climate change. The results from these analyses can be used to explain recently published declines in polar bear body condition, reproduction, and population numbers.

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