Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 82 Issue 5

September 2013

Volume 82, Issue 5

Pages 923–1115

  1. In Focus

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Physiological ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Macroecology
    7. Trophic interactions
    8. Life histories
    9. Spatial ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. You have free access to this content
      Numbers count: caste-specific component Allee effects and their interactions (pages 923–926)

      William Hughes

      Article first published online: 7 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12120

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      Allee effects are surprisingly widespread and are of profound importance for understanding ecological dynamics. This paper highlights a study by Luque, Giraud & Courchamp (2013) demonstrating Allee effects in ants, and places this in the context of the wider role of such effects in social insects.

  2. Population ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Physiological ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Macroecology
    7. Trophic interactions
    8. Life histories
    9. Spatial ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. Population responses of small mammals to food supply and predators: a global meta-analysis (pages 927–936)

      Jayme A. Prevedello, Chris R. Dickman, Marcus V. Vieira and Emerson M. Vieira

      Article first published online: 5 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12072

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      This paper presents a meta-analysis of 148 food supplementation experiments carried out with small mammals. The analyses support the view that animal population density is determined by both bottom-up and top-down forces. They also suggest the possibility that food supplementation experiments might unintentionally create ecological traps

    2. The relationship between phenotypic variation among offspring and mother body mass in wild boar: evidence of coin-flipping? (pages 937–945)

      Marlène Gamelon, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Eric Baubet, Sébastien Devillard, Ludovic Say, Serge Brandt and Olivier Gimenez

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12073

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      This study provides the first evidence that ‘coin-flipping’ reproductive tactics occur in wild boars. The findings change the traditional view of mammalian reproductive tactics because the decoupling between phenotypic attributes and litter size and the high phenotypic variation among litter mates both suggest that developmental constraints of mammals could be less than generally assumed.

    3. Population sex ratio and dispersal in experimental, two-patch metapopulations of butterflies (pages 946–955)

      Audrey Trochet, Delphine Legrand, Nicolas Larranaga, Simon Ducatez, Olivier Calvez, Julien Cote, Jean Clobert and Michel Baguette

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12082

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      Using a unique interconnected experimental system, the authors investigate the effect of sex ratio on dispersal in a butterfly. Controlling individual and population characteristics with this approach allows specific determination of the effect of varying sex ratio on the dispersal response, which is a breakthrough in knowledge of the dispersal process that would have been extremely difficult to achieve in nature.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Allee effects in ants (pages 956–965)

      Gloria M. Luque, Tatiana Giraud and Franck Courchamp

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12091

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      This study provides the first evidence of Allee effects in ants. The results demonstrate the differential effect of queens and workers on survival and productivity. A potential positive feedback between worker and queen abundance may have contributed to the evolution of large colony sizes.

  3. Physiological ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Physiological ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Macroecology
    7. Trophic interactions
    8. Life histories
    9. Spatial ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. Phenotype flexibility in wild fish: Dolly Varden regulate assimilative capacity to capitalize on annual pulsed subsidies (pages 966–975)

      Jonathan B. Armstrong and Morgan H. Bond

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12066

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      Here the authors document digestive flexibility in a high latitude fish that capitalizes on annual pulsed subsidies. This is one of the first examples of phenotype flexibility in wild fish, and one of the first studies to consider physiological adaptation to resource pulses.

  4. Parasite and disease ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Physiological ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Macroecology
    7. Trophic interactions
    8. Life histories
    9. Spatial ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. Social network analysis of wild chimpanzees provides insights for predicting infectious disease risk (pages 976–986)

      Julie Rushmore, Damien Caillaud, Leopold Matamba, Rebecca M. Stumpf, Stephen P. Borgatti and Sonia Altizer

      Article first published online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12088

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      The authors present the first network analysis of wild apes conducted within a framework of evaluating infectious disease risk. Overall, they show striking temporal variation in network structure, and identify traits that predict associations among individuals. This work provides insights into which chimpanzees should be targeted for disease control efforts.

    2. Temporal dynamics of direct reciprocal and indirect effects in a host–parasite network (pages 987–996)

      Shai Pilosof, Miguel A. Fortuna, Maxim V. Vinarski, Natalia P. Korallo-Vinarskaya and Boris R. Krasnov

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12090

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      This study shows, for the first time, that the effects hosts and parasites exert on each other (e.g. hosts providing resources to parasites and parasites exploiting the resources of hosts) are driven by temporally-persistent species. However, effects of some species vary greatly with time while those of others are temporally-stable.

  5. Macroecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Physiological ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Macroecology
    7. Trophic interactions
    8. Life histories
    9. Spatial ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. Bergmann's rule across the equator: a case study in Cerdocyon thous (Canidae) (pages 997–1008)

      Pablo A. Martinez, Dardo A. Marti, Wagner F. Molina and Claudio J. Bidau

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12076

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      This is one of the few studies testing Bergmann's rule in a tropical taxon, demonstrating two patterns of size variation in a canid species: populations south of the Equator follow Bergmann's rule while Northern populations reflect the opposite. The study implicates historical factors, local adaptation and genetic drift in influencing this deviation from Bergmann's rule.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The relationship between body mass and field metabolic rate among individual birds and mammals (pages 1009–1020)

      Lawrence N. Hudson, Nick J. B. Isaac and Daniel C. Reuman

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12086

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      The authors provide the first comprehensive empirical analysis of the scaling relationship between field metabolic rate and body mass in individual birds and mammals. The analysis reveals the importance of heterogeneity in the scaling exponent, with consequences for biomass and nutrient flow through communities, and the structure and functioning of whole ecosystems.

  6. Trophic interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Physiological ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Macroecology
    7. Trophic interactions
    8. Life histories
    9. Spatial ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. Downstairs drivers - root herbivores shape communities of above-ground herbivores and natural enemies via changes in plant nutrients (pages 1021–1030)

      Scott N. Johnson, Carolyn Mitchell, James W. McNicol, Jacqueline Thompson and Alison J. Karley

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12070

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      This is a clear demonstration of root herbivores affecting foliar herbivore community composition and natural enemy abundance in the field via two distinct plant-mediated nutritional mechanisms. Aphid populations, in particular, are initially driven by bottom-up effects (i.e. plant-mediated effects of root herbivory), but consequent increases in natural enemies trigger top-down regulation.

    2. Foraging and vulnerability traits modify predator–prey body mass allometry: freshwater macroinvertebrates as a case study (pages 1031–1041)

      Jan Klecka and David S. Boukal

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12078

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      The authors find that the strength of predator–prey interactions depends not only on predator and prey body size but also on their foraging and vulnerability traits. These results imply that the inclusion of the commonly available qualitative data on species traits could substantially increase biological realism of food web descriptions.

    3. Trophic complexity enhances ecosystem functioning in an aquatic detritus-based model system (pages 1042–1051)

      Jérémy Jabiol, Brendan G. McKie, Andreas Bruder, Caroline Bernadet, Mark O. Gessner and Eric Chauvet

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12079

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      This paper reports the results of a biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiment that for the first time manipulates diversity simultaneously within and across trophic levels. The key finding is that ecosystem functioning increases with food web complexity, suggesting that the consequences of biodiversity loss could be more severe than inferred from previous experiments.

    4. Increasing zooplankton size diversity enhances the strength of top-down control on phytoplankton through diet niche partitioning (pages 1052–1061)

      Lin Ye, Chun-Yi Chang, Carmen García-Comas, Gwo-Ching Gong and Chih-hao Hsieh

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12067

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      The results of this study suggest a new potential mechanism – that increasing predator size diversity enhances the strength of top-down control on prey through diet niche partitioning. This mechanism extends the current knowledge on top-down control in aquatic ecosystems, and may have important management implications.

    5. Multi-trophic resource selection function enlightens the behavioural game between wolves and their prey (pages 1062–1071)

      Nicolas Courbin, Daniel Fortin, Christian Dussault, Viviane Fargeot and Réhaume Courtois

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12093

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      The authors demonstrate that a combination of habitat selection analysis at several trophic levels and at multiple spatial scales can provide an efficient quantitative framework for studying predator-prey spatial games in dynamical systems where both groups move constantly. Focussing on a caribou-moose-wolf food web, the study illustrates how differences in fine-scale movement tactics between predators and prey create asymmetry in their relative encounter probabilities.

  7. Life histories

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Physiological ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Macroecology
    7. Trophic interactions
    8. Life histories
    9. Spatial ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. Complex phenological changes and their consequences in the breeding success of a migratory bird, the white stork Ciconia ciconia (pages 1072–1086)

      Oscar Gordo, Piotr Tryjanowski, Jakub Z. Kosicki and Miroslav Fulín

      Article first published online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12084

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      Using a very long-term, large-scale dataset of the migratory phenology of one of the most cherished European birds, the white stork, the authors provide new insights into the plastic and microevolutionary responses of migratory birds to climate change. Phenological changes and their long-term dynamics are shown to be much more complex than previously thought.

  8. Spatial ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Physiological ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Macroecology
    7. Trophic interactions
    8. Life histories
    9. Spatial ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. Habitat fragmentation and reproductive success: a structural equation modelling approach (pages 1087–1097)

      Eric Le Tortorec, Samuli Helle, Niina Käyhkö, Petri Suorsa, Esa Huhta and Harri Hakkarainen

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12075

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      This study uses structural equation modeling to realistically model habitat fragmentation as a hierarchical process using habitat data collected at an almost yearly frequency and a long-term dataset of biological data from an area-sensitive species. This increases our understanding of the effects of habitat fragmentation on reproductive success.

    2. Risk avoidance in sympatric large carnivores: reactive or predictive? (pages 1098–1105)

      Femke Broekhuis, Gabriele Cozzi, Marion Valeix, John W. McNutt and David W. Macdonald

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12077

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      The manner in which animals respond to risk is crucial in understanding species coexistence. Here the authors show that avoidance of more dominant predators by cheetahs in northern Botswana is reactive rather than predictive – a strategy that could be key in enabling competing species to coexist in an ecosystem where risks are widespread and recurrent.

  9. Behavioural ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Physiological ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Macroecology
    7. Trophic interactions
    8. Life histories
    9. Spatial ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. Nitrogen and amino acids in nectar modify food selection of nectarivorous bats (pages 1106–1115)

      Nelly Rodríguez-Peña, Kathryn E. Stoner, Jorge Ayala-Berdon, Cesar M. Flores-Ortiz, Angel Duran and Jorge E. Schondube

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12069

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      This study shows that regardless of the low concentrations at which nitrogen and amino acids are present in floral nectar, their presence affects bats' food selection by interfering with the bats' ability to detect differences in sugar concentrations, and by offering particular flavours that can be perceived and selected by nectarivorous bats.

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