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Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 82 Issue 6

November 2013

Volume 82, Issue 6

Pages 1117–1339

  1. In Focus

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Special Feature: Location-only and Use-availability Data. Analysis Methods Converge
    4. Community ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
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      Climate change heats matrix population models (pages 1117–1119)

      Salvador Herrando-Pérez

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12146

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      Metabolic theory predicts that demographic rates can be expressed as a function of environmental temperature. This 'In Focus' article highlights the paper in this issue by Amarasekare & Coutinho () in this issue, in which the authors challenge the assumptions of some recent studies that claim low population viability of tropical species based on intrinsic growth rates estimated from the Euler-Lotka equation.

  2. Special Feature: Location-only and Use-availability Data. Analysis Methods Converge

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Special Feature: Location-only and Use-availability Data. Analysis Methods Converge
    4. Community ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
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      Location-only and use-availability data: analysis methods converge (pages 1120–1124)

      Lyman McDonald, Bryan Manly, Falk Huettmann and Wayne Thogmartin

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12145

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      Advancing our thinking in presence-only and used-available analysis (pages 1125–1134)

      David Warton and Geert Aarts

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12071

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      The important problems of analysing used-available data and presence-only data are equivalent, and this paper leverages this equivalence to propose advances in analysis methodology. But perhaps we should be thinking more about how best to apply a given method - applying a method in different ways can give very different results.

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      Quantifying the effect of habitat availability on species distributions (pages 1135–1145)

      Geert Aarts, John Fieberg, Sophie Brasseur and Jason Matthiopoulos

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12061

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      This study shows that space use and habitat selection by animals changes drastically as a function of habitat availability, even when animals use simple and consistent movement rules to explore and exploit space. The utility of a variety of existing and new methods to explicitly estimate the influence of habitat availability is demonstrated, with potential for improved inference and prediction.

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      Reconciling resource utilization and resource selection functions (pages 1146–1154)

      Mevin B. Hooten, Ephraim M. Hanks, Devin S. Johnson and Mat W. Alldredge

      Version of Record online: 9 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12080

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      This paper compares and contrasts resource utilization and resource selection functions, showing that RUFs can actually out perform traditional RSFs in certain cases. This is the first paper to formally attempt to reconcile these two approaches for understanding animal resource selection.

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      Estimating animal resource selection from telemetry data using point process models (pages 1155–1164)

      Devin S. Johnson, Mevin B. Hooten and Carey E. Kuhn

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12087

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      The authors provide a novel method for analyzing telemetry data for resource selection inference using a space–time point process model. The method extends previous weighted distribution methods for easier implementation. In addition, they provide some corrections to previous space-only point process methods to help mitigate effects of location autocorrelation.

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      A re-evaluation of a case–control model with contaminated controls for resource selection studies (pages 1165–1173)

      Christopher T. Rota, Joshua J. Millspaugh, Dylan C. Kesler, Chad P. Lehman, Mark A. Rumble and Catherine M. B. Jachowski

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12092

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      This paper draws together a disparate literature and demonstrates, via simulations and an application to field data, that the case-control model with contaminated controls is a practical model for estimating the absolute probability of animal resource use from use-availability data.

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      The point process use-availability or presence-only likelihood and comments on analysis (pages 1174–1182)

      Trent L. McDonald

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12132

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      This paper generalizes the use-availability likelihood to point locations. It affirms that estimation of a RSF does not involve "running logistic regression", that the terms "use-availability" and "presence-only" are synonyms, that the objective of estimation should be the RSF not the RSPF, and that logistic links are inappropriate.

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      Selection, use, choice and occupancy: clarifying concepts in resource selection studies (pages 1183–1191)

      Subhash R. Lele, Evelyn H. Merrill, Jonah Keim and Mark S. Boyce

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12141

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      There is substantial confusion regarding different concepts and definitions used in resource selection studies. This paper clarifies the concepts and their interrelationships. This will help appropriate application of statistical analyses in wildlife management.

  3. Community ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Special Feature: Location-only and Use-availability Data. Analysis Methods Converge
    4. Community ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
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      Patterns of top-down control in a seagrass ecosystem: could a roving apex predator induce a behaviour-mediated trophic cascade? (pages 1192–1202)

      Derek A. Burkholder, Michael R. Heithaus, James W. Fourqurean, Aaron Wirsing and Lawrence M. Dill

      Version of Record online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12097

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      This paper presents unique experimental evidence that sharks can structure ecosystems through risk effects. Specifically, the authors show that tiger sharks indirectly structure seagrass communities by inducing risk-sensitive foraging by sea turtles and sea cows. This work shows that roving predators, in general, can induce behavior-mediated trophic cascades.

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      The importance of landscape and spatial structure for hymenopteran-based food webs in an agro-ecosystem (pages 1203–1214)

      Yvonne Fabian, Nadine Sandau, Odile T. Bruggisser, Alex Aebi, Patrik Kehrli, Rudolf P. Rohr, Russell E. Naisbit and Louis-Félix Bersier

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12103

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      This paper focuses on the diversity and abundance of trap-nesting bees, wasps and their enemies, and compares the importance of landscape composition, spatial arrangement, and vegetation on the complexity and the structure of their food webs. For the first time, the authors disentangle the underlying mechanisms for variation in quantitative food-web metrics such as vulnerability, generality and compartmentalization. 

  4. Population ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Special Feature: Location-only and Use-availability Data. Analysis Methods Converge
    4. Community ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
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      Dynamic species distribution models from categorical survey data (pages 1215–1226)

      Nova Mieszkowska, Gregg Milligan, Michael T. Burrows, Rob Freckleton and Matthew Spencer

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12100

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      In order to understand population dynamics, data from many locations at multiple time points are needed. It can be very expensive and time-consuming to get precise estimates of abundance at such large scales. Instead, categorical abundance estimates (with categories such as “not seen”, “rare”, “occasional”, ...) are often used. Here, the authors describe ways of extracting approximate information on long-term population dynamics from data of this kind.

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      Density-dependent life history and the dynamics of small populations (pages 1227–1239)

      Marianne Mugabo, Samuel Perret, Stéphane Legendre and Jean-François Le Galliard

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12109

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      The lack of reliable life-history data often prevents to make accurate demographic predictions for populations regulated by density dependence. Here, the authors use a realistic field experiment combined with age-structured population models to investigate the relationship between density, life-history, population growth and predicted extinction dynamics in the common lizard.

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      The intrinsic growth rate as a predictor of population viability under climate warming (pages 1240–1253)

      Priyanga Amarasekare and Renato M. Coutinho

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12112

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      Motivated by recent interest in the effects of climate warming on the population viability of ectotherms, this study provides the first attempt at a mechanistic integration of trait responses to temperature with stage-structured population dynamics in thermally variable environments.

  5. Evolutionary ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Special Feature: Location-only and Use-availability Data. Analysis Methods Converge
    4. Community ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. You have free access to this content
      The evolution of the nutrient composition of mammalian milks (pages 1254–1264)

      Amy L. Skibiel, Lauren M. Downing, Teri J. Orr and Wendy R. Hood

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12095

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      Milk composition is a critical component of a lactation strategy and varies substantially among species, yet we know relatively little about the selective pressures shaping the evolution of mammalian milks. In this article, the authors show that milk composition is largely a function of evolutionary history, maternal nutrient intake, and duration of milk production.

  6. Parasite and disease ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Special Feature: Location-only and Use-availability Data. Analysis Methods Converge
    4. Community ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. You have free access to this content
      Phylogeny determines the role of helminth parasites in intertidal food webs (pages 1265–1275)

      Robert Poulin, Boris R. Krasnov, Shai Pilosof and David W. Thieltges

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12101

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      This study uncovers a very strong phylogenetic signal in parasite species roles within food webs, suggesting that the role of any parasite species in a web, including new invasive species, is to some extent predictable based solely on its taxonomic affiliations.

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      Marine protected areas facilitate parasite populations among four fished host species of central Chile (pages 1276–1287)

      Chelsea L. Wood, Fiorenza Micheli, Miriam Fernández, Stefan Gelcich, Juan Carlos Castilla and Juan Carvajal

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12104

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      Using a system of protected and matched open-access areas, the authors demonstrate that fishing can drive declines in marine parasite abundance. Considering the substantial ecological role that many parasites play in marine communities, these results suggest that fishing could have cryptic but important effects on community structure and ecosystem function through its effects on parasites.

  7. Trophic interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Special Feature: Location-only and Use-availability Data. Analysis Methods Converge
    4. Community ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. You have free access to this content
      Trophic cascades: linking ungulates to shrub-dependent birds and butterflies (pages 1288–1299)

      Kristine J. Teichman, Scott E. Nielsen and Jens Roland

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12094

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      Here the authors demonstrate the cascading effects of high ungulate density on a shrub-dependent bird, Yellow warbler and butterfly, Canadian Tiger Swallowtail. The models suggest an importance of the top predator's regulatory role for maintaining ecosystem function by highlighting the indirect effects, ungulates have on other shrub-dependent species in the absence of predators in the ecosystem.

  8. Physiological ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Special Feature: Location-only and Use-availability Data. Analysis Methods Converge
    4. Community ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Estimating resource acquisition and at-sea body condition of a marine predator (pages 1300–1315)

      Robert S. Schick, Leslie F. New, Len Thomas, Daniel P. Costa, Mark A. Hindell, Clive R. McMahon, Patrick W. Robinson, Samantha E. Simmons, Michele Thums, John Harwood and James S. Clark

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12102

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      Body condition mediates ecological processes at many scales, yet it is difficult to measure in situ. Here the authors provide estimates of absolute body condition in two species of top marine predators. These estimates inform the link between foraging location and foraging success, which has important demographic implications for these species (Photo credit Jason Bradley).

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      Hot tadpoles from cold environments need more nutrients – life history and stoichiometry reflects latitudinal adaptation (pages 1316–1325)

      Antonia Liess, Owen Rowe, Junwen Guo, Gustaf Thomsson and Martin I. Lind

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12107

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      Within the context of ecological stoichiometry theory, this study combines ecology with evolution by relating latitudinal life-history adaptations to their molecular consequences in body nutrient composition in Rana temporaria tadpoles. This study is novel in its integration of ecological and evolutionary concepts.

  9. Behavioural ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Special Feature: Location-only and Use-availability Data. Analysis Methods Converge
    4. Community ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    1. You have free access to this content
      Seasonality, weather and climate affect home range size in roe deer across a wide latitudinal gradient within Europe (pages 1326–1339)

      Nicolas Morellet, Christophe Bonenfant, Luca Börger, Federico Ossi, Francesca Cagnacci, Marco Heurich, Petter Kjellander, John D. C. Linnell, Sandro Nicoloso, Pavel Sustr, Ferdinando Urbano and Atle Mysterud

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12105

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      This paper presents the first pan-European study of the biogeography of home range size in a large herbivore based on GPS locations in seven study sites across Europe. The findings are broadly consistent across the distributional range of this species, demonstrating a strong and ubiquitous link between the amplitude and timing of environmental seasonality and home range size at the continental scale.

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