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Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 83 Issue 1

January 2014

Volume 83, Issue 1

Pages 1–317

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann
    5. Synthesis paper
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Behavioural ecology
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Population ecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Trophic interactions
    13. Parasite and disease ecology
    14. Community ecology
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      The times they are a-changin’: evolution and revolution in animal ecology publishing (pages 1–4)

      Kenneth Wilson, Tim Coulson, Mike Boots, Liz Baker and Peter Livermore

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12176

  2. In Focus

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann
    5. Synthesis paper
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Behavioural ecology
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Population ecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Trophic interactions
    13. Parasite and disease ecology
    14. Community ecology
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      Tracking animals to their death (pages 5–6)

      Graeme C. Hays

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12164

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      This In Focus article highlights the study by Klaassen et al. (2014) which satellite tracked birds to their deaths and showed that rate of mortality during migration was six times that during stationary phases when birds were on their winter and summer grounds. Satellite tracking may allow high-risk hotspots to be identified for wide-ranging species.

  3. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann
    5. Synthesis paper
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Behavioural ecology
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Population ecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Trophic interactions
    13. Parasite and disease ecology
    14. Community ecology
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      Metabolic ecology (pages 7–19)

      Murray M. Humphries and Kevin S. McCann

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12124

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      Ecological theory that is grounded in metabolic currencies and constraints offers the potential to link ecological outcomes to biophysical processes across multiple scales of organization. Here, in introducing the Special Feature, the authors describe the theory, models, and research networks that define the field of metabolic ecology and outline future research priorities.

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      Reconciling theories for metabolic scaling (pages 20–29)

      James L. Maino, Michael R. Kearney, Roger M. Nisbet and Sebastiaan A. L. M. Kooijman

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12085

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      Using Dynamic Energy Budget theory, the authors consider universal constraints on the storage and use of assimilated nutrients and derive an equation for the body-size scaling of metabolic rate without relying on optimisation arguments. The mechanism offers an explanation for differences between the intra- and inter-specific scaling of biological rates with mass.

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      Foraging currencies, metabolism and behavioural routines (pages 30–40)

      Alasdair I. Houston and John M. McNamara

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12096

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      The authors provide a succinct review of the basic formulation of foraging ‘currencies’ characterising foraging behaviour, a fundamental issue in foraging theory. Variations are introduced by examining predation, condition, time of day, and ‘damage’ considerations.

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      Phenotypic clines, energy balances and ecological responses to climate change (pages 41–50)

      Lauren B. Buckley, César R. Nufio and Joel G. Kingsolver

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12083

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      Here the authors document clinal variation in body size, but only modest variation in thermal tolerances and metabolic rates along the elevation gradient. These results show that quantifying energy balances and allocation offers a viable approach for predicting how populations will respond to climate change.

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      Competition and the density dependence of metabolic rates (pages 51–58)

      John P. DeLong, Torrance C. Hanley and David A. Vasseur

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12065

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      In this contribution to the Special Feature on ‘Metabolism as a Currency and Constraint in Ecology’, the authors show that many organisms display a power-law dependence of metabolic rate with population density that is likely caused by density-dependent foraging rates. These results open a new window into the relative performance of organisms with implications for scaling up energetic fluxes and understanding rare or invasive species.

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      A metabolic perspective on competition and body size reductions with warming (pages 59–69)

      Daniel C. Reuman, Robert D. Holt and Gabriel Yvon-Durocher

      Article first published online: 22 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12064

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      This paper, a model of phytoplankton growth and competition for nutrients, provides the first competition-based explanation for why body sizes of ectotherms are smaller in warmer environments and appear to be shrinking with climate change. This work is an important contribution towards predicting possible future impacts of climate change on ecological systems.

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      Temperature dependence of trophic interactions are driven by asymmetry of species responses and foraging strategy (pages 70–84)

      Anthony I. Dell, Samraat Pawar and Van M. Savage

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12081

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      This paper presents general mechanistic theory to predict effects of temperature (due to climate change and seasonal variation) on consumer–resource interactions. Better understanding of how temperature influences species interactions will lead to more accurate predictions for how communities, food webs and ecosystems will respond to current and future temperature changes.

  4. Synthesis paper

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann
    5. Synthesis paper
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Behavioural ecology
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Population ecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Trophic interactions
    13. Parasite and disease ecology
    14. Community ecology
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      Insights into population ecology from long-term studies of red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus (pages 85–98)

      Jesus Martínez-Padilla, Steve M. Redpath, Mohammed Zeineddine and François Mougeot

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12098

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      Long-term studies have been the backbone of population ecology. This paper reviews the trajectory and impact of red grouse studies in this field. The authors highlight the impact of parasites on red grouse population dynamics, the role of intrinsic mechanisms in cyclic dynamics, and the need to consider multiple, interacting mechanisms.

  5. Evolutionary ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann
    5. Synthesis paper
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Behavioural ecology
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Population ecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Trophic interactions
    13. Parasite and disease ecology
    14. Community ecology
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      The contribution of an avian top predator to selection in prey species (pages 99–106)

      Oscar Vedder, Sandra Bouwhuis and Ben C. Sheldon

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12114

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      In this study, the authors provide compelling evidence that sparrowhawk predation acts as an important causal agent of selection on a key predictor of avian fitness, fledging mass, in great tits but not in blue tits. In general, they show that variation in predation pressure can therefore account for variation in selection, but that specific patterns may not be easily generalised across species.

  6. Life histories

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann
    5. Synthesis paper
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Behavioural ecology
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Population ecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Trophic interactions
    13. Parasite and disease ecology
    14. Community ecology
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      One size fits all: Eurasian lynx females share a common optimal litter size (pages 107–115)

      Jean-Michel Gaillard, Erlend B. Nilsen, John Odden, Henrik Andrén and John D. C. Linnell

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12110

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      Twinning in Eurasian lynx has evolved as a bet-hedging life history tactic in response to high unpredictability of food supply during lactation. Here it is shown that a litter size of two leads to more recruits and much lower variance in recruitment than larger litters, resulting in a fitness advantage for females producing twins.

  7. Behavioural ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann
    5. Synthesis paper
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Behavioural ecology
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Population ecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Trophic interactions
    13. Parasite and disease ecology
    14. Community ecology
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      Foraging strategy of a neotropical primate: how intrinsic and extrinsic factors influence destination and residence time (pages 116–125)

      Sabrina Plante, Fernando Colchero and Sophie Calmé

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12119

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      Here the authors describe the foraging strategy the black howler monkey using both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, and characterize the foraging performance of the monkey troops based on general optimal foraging theory predictions. This research provides a clear example of how movement data of high spatio-temporal resolution, when combined with the appropriate methods of movement modelling, can enlighten important ecological processes.

  8. Physiological ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann
    5. Synthesis paper
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Behavioural ecology
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Population ecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Trophic interactions
    13. Parasite and disease ecology
    14. Community ecology
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      From physiology to space use: energy reserves and androgenization explain home-range size variation in a woodland rodent (pages 126–135)

      Ben Godsall, Tim Coulson and Aurelio F. Malo

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12116

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      The authors study a wild rodent population to disentangle the relative contributions of habitat structure and the novel individual-level variables of energy reserves and androgenisation on space use. They introduce a novel tracking method using a system of custom-designed mobile PIT-tag-recording units.

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      Age-related variation in energy expenditure in a long-lived bird within the envelope of an energy ceiling (pages 136–146)

      Kyle H. Elliott, Maryline Le Vaillant, Akiko Kato, Anthony J. Gaston, Yan Ropert-Coudert, James F. Hare, John R. Speakman and Donald Croll

      Article first published online: 30 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12126

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      If animals increased energy expenditure, they would likely produce more offspring. Why then is energy expenditure limited? In the case of a seabird with an unusual fledging strategy (offspring fledge at only 20-30% of adult size), expenditure is limited by intrinsic constraints, such as digestion. This explains why the birds are unable to continue feeding their young to adult size at the breeding colony.

  9. Population ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann
    5. Synthesis paper
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Behavioural ecology
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Population ecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Trophic interactions
    13. Parasite and disease ecology
    14. Community ecology
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      Increasing density leads to generalization in both coarse-grained habitat selection and fine-grained resource selection in a large mammal (pages 147–156)

      Floris M. van Beest, Antonio Uzal, Eric Vander Wal, Michel P. Laforge, Adrienne L. Contasti, David Colville and Philip D. McLoughlin

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12115

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      From detailed study of the movements and population dynamics of the Sable Island horses, van Beest et al. show that theory on density-dependent habitat selection originally developed using coarse-grained (discrete) habitat use can and does apply to the fine-grained world of the multivariable resource selection function. Increasing density weakens habitat and resource selection at multiple scales, meaning that users of resource selection functions must appreciate density in their interpretation of habitat selection.

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      Spatial variation buffers temporal fluctuations in early juvenile survival for an endangered Pacific salmon (pages 157–167)

      James T. Thorson, Mark D. Scheuerell, Eric R. Buhle and Timothy Copeland

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12117

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      The authors estimate variability over time and space in juvenile survival for a salmon metapopulation and estimate the magnitude of synchrony in resulting productivity parameters. They thereby demonstrate the portfolio effect, that is, that spatial variation helps to buffer a demographic rate representing juvenile productivity, with implications for metapopulation abundance.

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      The interacting effects of diversity and propagule pressure on early colonization and population size (pages 168–175)

      Luke H. Hedge, Brian Leung, Wayne A. O'Connor and Emma L. Johnston

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12125

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      Diversity and propagule pressure are both implicated as strong drivers of the establishment and persistence of species, yet they are often examined in isolation. This paper is the first to examine the interaction between diversity and propagule pressure, using both theoretical modelling and realistic manipulations of a key marine species.

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      When and where does mortality occur in migratory birds? Direct evidence from long-term satellite tracking of raptors (pages 176–184)

      Raymond H. G. Klaassen, Mikael Hake, Roine Strandberg, Ben J. Koks, Christiane Trierweiler, Klaus-Michael Exo, Franz Bairlein and Thomas Alerstam

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12135

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      The authors use satellite telemetry to describe when and where migratory raptors die during the annual cycle. Daily mortality is six times higher during migration than during stationary periods (breeding and wintering), but total mortality is surprisingly equal between seasons, as ‘dangerous’ migration periods are shorter than ‘safe’ stationary periods.

  10. Spatial ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann
    5. Synthesis paper
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Behavioural ecology
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Population ecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Trophic interactions
    13. Parasite and disease ecology
    14. Community ecology
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      Spatio-temporal dynamics in the response of woodland caribou and moose to the passage of grey wolf (pages 185–198)

      Guillaume Latombe, Daniel Fortin and Lael Parrott

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12108

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      Few studies consider that prey and predators are both in motion in their analyses. This study accounts for such dynamic distributions, and as such, it offers a rare assessment of how a combination of short-and long-term anti-predator responses to predation risk drives the spatial dynamics of large herbivores.

  11. Trophic interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann
    5. Synthesis paper
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Behavioural ecology
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Population ecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Trophic interactions
    13. Parasite and disease ecology
    14. Community ecology
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      Multi-tissue stable isotope analysis and acoustic telemetry reveal seasonal variability in the trophic interactions of juvenile bull sharks in a coastal estuary (pages 199–213)

      Philip Matich and Michael R. Heithaus

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12106

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      In this paper the authors use data from acoustic telemetry and stable isotope analysis to predict diet shifts associated with environmental changes by creating theoretical models and testing them against the collected data. This approach is widely applicable for all scenarios in which researchers hope to understand and predict how environmental change may lead to changes in resources and in turn how this affects community dynamics.

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      Fear on the move: predator hunting mode predicts variation in prey mortality and plasticity in prey spatial response (pages 214–222)

      Jennifer R. B. Miller, Judith M. Ament and Oswald J. Schmitz

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12111

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      The paper reports on a novel, experimental test of recent theory linking predator hunting strategies (hunting mode and spatial movement) to prey mortality and antipredator spatial movement. The authors find that spider activity levels and hunting method do indeed predict grasshopper mortality, movement and space use – an important advance in the new trait-based approach to predicting community dynamics.

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      Trophic cascades from wolves to grizzly bears in Yellowstone (pages 223–233)

      William J. Ripple, Robert L. Beschta, Jennifer K. Fortin and Charles T. Robbins

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12123

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      The is the first study to show how wolves may benefit grizzly bears as mediated by changes in elk herbivory on berry-producing shrubs.

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      Seasonal phenology of interactions involving short-lived annual plants, a multivoltine herbivore and its endoparasitoid wasp (pages 234–244)

      Minghui Fei, Rieta Gols and Jeffrey A. Harvey

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12122

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      This is the first study to implicitly acknowledge the importance of seasonal phenology of short-lived food plants on the development of a multivoltine insect herbivore and its parasitoid. These insights add ecological realism to studies of trophic interactions.

  12. Parasite and disease ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann
    5. Synthesis paper
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Behavioural ecology
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Population ecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Trophic interactions
    13. Parasite and disease ecology
    14. Community ecology
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      Dynamics of macronutrient self-medication and illness-induced anorexia in virally infected insects (pages 245–255)

      Sonia Povey, Sheena C. Cotter, Stephen J. Simpson and Kenneth Wilson

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12127

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      This is the first study to simultaneously address the combined effects of parasitism-induced reduced food intake and nutrient selection in a single analytical framework. The authors show that caterpillars self-medicate by increasing the protein content of their diet immediately after infection, and that this is a phenotypically plastic response, not a consequence of genetically based differences in diet choice between families.

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      Impact of host nutritional status on infection dynamics and parasite virulence in a bird-malaria system (pages 256–265)

      Stéphane Cornet, Coraline Bichet, Stephen Larcombe, Bruno Faivre and Gabriele Sorci

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12113

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      Host nutritional status is a key factor in disease epidemiology. Indeed, malnutrition is often associated to increased susceptibility to pathogenic infections. Here, the authors find that host nutrition has strong effects on infection dynamics and virulence and demonstrate complex interactions between past and current environments of the parasite on disease dynamics and costs to the hosts.

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      Juveniles and migrants as drivers for seasonal epizootics of avian influenza virus (pages 266–275)

      Jacintha G. B. van Dijk, Bethany J. Hoye, Josanne H. Verhagen, Bart A. Nolet, Ron A. M. Fouchier and Marcel Klaassen

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12131

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      Our study represents the first attempt to empirically link three suggested drivers (i.e. naïve juveniles, susceptible migrants, host density) to avian influenza infection dynamics in wildlife. Our novel, multi-faceted approach demonstrates the importance of host demography and migratory behaviour in explaining season patterns in wildlife diseases.

  13. Community ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. In Focus
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: METABOLIC CONSTRAINTS AND CURRENCIES IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY Guest Editors: Murray Humphries & Kevin McCann
    5. Synthesis paper
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Life histories
    8. Behavioural ecology
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Population ecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Trophic interactions
    13. Parasite and disease ecology
    14. Community ecology
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      Determinants of extinction-colonization dynamics in Mediterranean butterflies: the role of landscape, climate and local habitat features (pages 276–285)

      Albert Fernández-Chacón, Constantí Stefanescu, Meritxell Genovart, James D. Nichols, James E. Hines, Ferran Páramo, Marco Turco and Daniel Oro

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12118

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      By applying multiseason occupancy models to 73 species' detection–nondetection data sets, this study provides insights about the roles of different habitat, landscape and environmental features on the extinction–colonization patterns of Mediterranean butterflies, thus providing useful information for the conservation of butterfly diversity in the Mediterranean region under current global change.

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      Snake co-occurrence patterns are best explained by habitat and hypothesized effects of interspecific interactions (pages 286–295)

      David A. Steen, Christopher J. W. McClure, Jean C. Brock, D. Craig Rudolph, Josh B. Pierce, James R. Lee, W. Jeffrey Humphries, Beau B. Gregory, William B. Sutton, Lora L. Smith, Danna L. Baxley, Dirk J. Stevenson and Craig Guyer

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12121

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      Different species of snakes are generally thought to be able to live in the same area because they eat different things. However, this study provides evidence that different species are actually competing with each other over resources and lesser competitors are unable to persist in a given area. Photo by Aubrey Heupel.

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      Mechanisms of biotic resistance across complex life cycles (pages 296–305)

      Marc Rius, Elaine E. Potter, J. David Aguirre and John J. Stachowicz

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12129

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      Studies of biotic resistance that consider single processes or life-history stages may provide an incomplete picture. The authors demonstrate that different mechanisms of biotic resistance occur across the life cycle of an introduced marine invertebrate. The presence of different mechanisms suggests that they interact to enhance resident community's resistance to invasion.

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      Downscaling pollen–transport networks to the level of individuals (pages 306–317)

      Cristina Tur, Beatriz Vigalondo, Kristian Trøjelsgaard, Jens M. Olesen and Anna Traveset

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12130

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      For the first time, the authors downscale an entire pollen-transport network to the individual level for the pollinators. This novel approach offers the possibility of linking networks to foraging behaviour, and even to evolutionary biology, by working at the proper scale.

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