Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 83 Issue 2

March 2014

Volume 83, Issue 2

Pages 319–524

  1. In Focus

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Life histories
    4. Spatial ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Community ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Molecular ecology
    1. Accounting for individual behavioural variation in studies of habitat selection (pages 319–321)

      Aaron J. Wirsing and Michael R. Heithaus

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12200

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      This In Focus article uses the study by DeCesare et al. (2014), which showed that caribou did not avoid wolf predation risk to the extent that would minimize mortality, as a springboard for discussing the choice of fitness proxies and the need to account for individual behavioural variation in analyses of resource selection.

  2. Life histories

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Life histories
    4. Spatial ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Community ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Molecular ecology
    1. Offspring size in a resident species affects community assembly (pages 322–331)

      Kurt Davis and Dustin J. Marshall

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12136

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      Here, the authors focus, for the first time, on the consequences of offspring size variation on community assembly. Their results raise the possibility that mothers can manipulate the environment that offspring experience.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Maternal, social and abiotic environmental effects on growth vary across life stages in a cooperative mammal (pages 332–342)

      Sinead English, Andrew W. Bateman, Rafael Mares, Arpat Ozgul and Tim H. Clutton-Brock

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12149

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      This study uniquely compares abiotic, social and maternal factors affecting growth from birth until adulthood in a wild, cooperative mammal. Rain is important across all stages, whereas mothers and helpers influence growth most in early development. Understanding such complex environmental effects on development is important in a changing world.

  3. Spatial ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Life histories
    4. Spatial ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Community ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Molecular ecology
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Linking habitat selection and predation risk to spatial variation in survival (pages 343–352)

      Nicholas J. DeCesare, Mark Hebblewhite, Mark Bradley, David Hervieux, Lalenia Neufeld and Marco Musiani

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12144

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      We show that spatial variation in woodland caribou survival correlates positively to resource selection models describing their behavior, but model selection also reveals an additive effect of wolf predation risk on survival. Thus, survival-based depictions of habitat quality need account concurrently for spatial variation in both resource selection and predation risk.

    2. The Lévy flight foraging hypothesis in a pelagic seabird (pages 353–364)

      Stefano Focardi and Jacopo G. Cecere

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12147

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      There has recently been renewed debate about whether or not some sea birds have foraging patterns that are well represented by Lévy flights. This new study fills an important gap in the discussion by providing direct evidence for Lévy flights in the flight patterns of individual Cory's shearwaters. We show that Lévy flights are more likely when birds forage on poor prey field, near the colony.

  4. Population ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Life histories
    4. Spatial ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Community ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Molecular ecology
    1. Effects of exploitation on an overabundant species: the lesser snow goose predicament (pages 365–374)

      David N. Koons, Robert F. Rockwell and Lise M. Aubry

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12133

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      Controlling invasive and overabundant species is of global economic and conservation importance. Here, Koons and colleagues provide a rigorous framework for evaluating the (in) effectiveness of population control efforts and utilizing science in an adaptive management framework on which more effective population control policies can be based. Photo by Lise Aubry.

    2. Demographic responses of a site-faithful and territorial predator to its fluctuating prey: long-tailed skuas and arctic lemmings (pages 375–387)

      Frédéric Barraquand, Toke T. Høye, John-André Henden, Nigel G. Yoccoz, Olivier Gilg, Niels M. Schmidt, Benoît Sittler and Rolf A. Ims

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12140

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      This paper highlights two current topics in populations dynamics: firstly, the importance of floater individuals, who are crucial here to population persistence, and secondly, positive effects of environmental variability, in contrast to usually negative effects. Photo: Long-tailed skua pair, R.A. Ims.

  5. Trophic interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Life histories
    4. Spatial ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Community ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Molecular ecology
    1. Habitat-former effects on prey behaviour increase predation and non-predation mortality (pages 388–396)

      Paul E. Gribben and Jeffrey T. Wright

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12139

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      Habitat-forming species can simultaneously alter structural and non-structural abiotic conditions that may act have opposing effects on associated prey species. Here the authors show that the negative effects of a habitat-former on the behaviour of associated species, via non-structural abiotic conditions, can outweigh positive effects provided by habitat-structure.

  6. Parasite and disease ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Life histories
    4. Spatial ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Community ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Molecular ecology
    1. A trade-off between quantity and quality of offspring in haematophagous ectoparasites: the effect of the level of specialization (pages 397–405)

      Irina S. Khokhlova, Shai Pilosof, Laura J. Fielden, A. Allan Degen and Boris R. Krasnov

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12134

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      Here, the authors demonstrate, for the first time, that an occurrence of a trade-off between quality and quantity of offspring in parasitic species depends on the level of specialization in feeding strategy.

    2. Linking social and pathogen transmission networks using microbial genetics in giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) (pages 406–414)

      Kimberly L. VanderWaal, Edward R. Atwill, Lynne. A. Isbell and Brenda McCowan

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12137

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      This study utilizes a novel approach to quantify pathogen transmission patterns in wild giraffe. A transmission network was constructed by interlinking individuals if they shared genetic subtypes of Escherichia coli. This network was compared to networks representing giraffe social and spatial patterns. This integrative approach provides new insights about social dynamics in pathogen transmission.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Viral antibody dynamics in a chiropteran host (pages 415–428)

      Kate S. Baker, Richard Suu-Ire, Jennifer Barr, David T. S. Hayman, Christopher C. Broder, Daniel L. Horton, Christopher Durrant, Pablo R. Murcia, Andrew A. Cunningham and James L. N. Wood

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12153

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      This is the first study of henipaviral infection dynamics in a fully closed population of the natural reservoir hosts. The authors detect population-level infection persistence as well as increased periods of viral transmission related to life-cycle events. These data help us to understand the seasonality of recurrent zoonotic spillovers of viruses from bat populations.

    4. Dispersal in a patchy landscape reveals contrasting determinants of infection in a wild avian malaria system (pages 429–439)

      Sarah C. L. Knowles, Matthew J. Wood, Ricardo Alves and Ben C. Sheldon

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12154

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      This study uses a novel approach to elucidate exactly when and where hosts become infected, for a vector-borne disease system where hosts are highly mobile (avian malaria). The authors show that in a single host population, two parasite species infect hosts at different life-history stages, leading to contrasting predictions about host–parasite coevolution.

  7. Evolutionary ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Life histories
    4. Spatial ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Community ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Molecular ecology
    1. Adaptation of reproductive phenology to climate change with ecological feedback via dominance hierarchies (pages 440–449)

      Jacob Johansson, Henrik G. Smith and Niclas Jonzén

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12151

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      By elucidating how dominance hierarchies and competitive interactions among offspring affect adaptation of timing of reproduction, the authors introduce a novel approach for interpreting phenological trends in species of a residential bird. This analysis also reveals new connections between demographic responses, phenological shifts and changes in winter survival and overall productivity.

    2. Trophic niche width increases with bill-size variation in a generalist passerine: a test of niche variation hypothesis (pages 450–459)

      Yu-Cheng Hsu, Pei-Jen Shaner, Chun-I Chang, Linhua Ke and Shuh-Ji Kao

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12152

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      Using stable isotope values to quantify population trophic niche width, the authors demonstrate a novel way to test a classic evolutionary hypothesis, the niche variation hypothesis, in a generalist passerine. This approach has the potential to be widely applied to various taxa in a standardized way and can promote future meta-analysis.

  8. Community ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Life histories
    4. Spatial ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Community ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Molecular ecology
    1. When does diversity matter? Species functional diversity and ecosystem functioning across habitats and seasons in a field experiment (pages 460–469)

      André Frainer, Brendan G. McKie and Björn Malmqvist

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12142

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      This work greatly enhances our understanding of which aspects of biodiversity are most important for ecosystem functioning, what their importance relative to other biotic and abiotic drivers is, and the spatial and temporal circumstances under which biodiversity is most likely to influence functioning in nature.

    2. Species versus guild level differentiation revealed across the annual cycle by isotopic niche examination (pages 470–478)

      Thomas W. Bodey, Eric J. Ward, Richard A. Phillips, Rona A. R. McGill and Stuart Bearhop

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12156

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      This study highlights the key role of non-breeding dynamics in alleviating competition and promoting distinctions between species through the facilitation of resource partitioning. Considering hierarchical competitive interactions alongside abiotic constraints across the complete annual cycle generates a fuller understanding of the role of competition in driving patterns of character displacement.

  9. Behavioural ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Life histories
    4. Spatial ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Community ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Molecular ecology
    1. Assessing sex-related chick provisioning in greater flamingo Phoenicopterus roseus parents using capture–recapture models (pages 479–490)

      Miguel A. Rendón, Araceli Garrido, Manuel Rendón-Martos, José M. Ramírez and Juan A. Amat

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12138

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      By analysing resightings of individually marked flamingos, this study provides empirical evidence that capture-recapture models can be successfully applied to estimate probabilities of desertion and commuting when parents do not visit their chicks daily and the marking of adults to track their movements (e.g. telemetry) is difficult.

    2. The role of social environment on parental care: offspring benefit more from the presence of female than male helpers (pages 491–503)

      Lyanne Brouwer, Martijn van de Pol and Andrew Cockburn

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12143

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      Previous studies on parental care in cooperative breeders have focused on effects of group size on an individual's investment. Here the authors propose the ‘Social Environment’ hypothesis, which states that the type of helpers (specified by e.g. their sex or personality) present in the group will affect an individual's investment strategy.

    3. Does moonlight increase predation risk? Meta-analysis reveals divergent responses of nocturnal mammals to lunar cycles (pages 504–514)

      Laura R. Prugh and Christopher D. Golden

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12148

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      Does moonlight increase predation risk? This meta-analysis of nocturnal mammals finds that moonlight suppresses the activity of most species, indicating increased risk, but many prey species are more active with bright moonlight. Increased illumination may therefore benefit some prey through improved detection of predators and foraging efficiency.

  10. Molecular ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Life histories
    4. Spatial ecology
    5. Population ecology
    6. Trophic interactions
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Evolutionary ecology
    9. Community ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Molecular ecology
    1. Inbreeding avoidance, patch isolation and matrix permeability influence dispersal and settlement choices by male agile antechinus in a fragmented landscape (pages 515–524)

      Sam C. Banks and David B. Lindenmayer

      Article first published online: 30 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12128

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      The authors use detailed data on individual dispersal events to test hypotheses about the factors influencing non-randomness of dispersal in fragmented landscapes. They show that the avoidance of inbreeding has previously unappreciated effects on the ways in which animals move across natural landscapes, and in particular a strong effect on where individuals go after leaving home.

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