Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 83 Issue 3

May 2014

Volume 83, Issue 3

Pages 525–739

  1. In Focus

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. ‘How to...’
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Molecular ecology
    8. Community ecology
    9. Macroecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Climate ecology
    1. Integrating comparative functional response experiments into global change research (pages 525–527)

      Eoin J. O'Gorman

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12216

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      The article focuses on the paper by Barrios-O'Neill et al. (2014) and in doing so discusses the functional response and non-trophic interaction literature in the context of biological invasions. It also provides a future framework for integrating laboratory experiments, field manipulations and modelling approaches in global change research.

  2. ‘How to...’

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. ‘How to...’
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Molecular ecology
    8. Community ecology
    9. Macroecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Climate ecology
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Building integral projection models: a user's guide (pages 528–545)

      Mark Rees, Dylan Z. Childs and Stephen P. Ellner

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12178

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      A detailed description of the steps involved in constructing an IPM, explaining how to: (i) translate your study system into an IPM; (ii) implement your IPM; and (iii) diagnose potential problems with your IPM. We emphasize how the study organism's life cycle, and the timing of censuses, together determine the structure of the IPM kernel and important aspects of the statistical analysis used to parameterise an IPM using data on marked individuals.

  3. Trophic interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. ‘How to...’
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Molecular ecology
    8. Community ecology
    9. Macroecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Climate ecology
    1. Cascading effects of predator–detritivore interactions depend on environmental context in a Tibetan alpine meadow (pages 546–556)

      Xinwei Wu, John N. Griffin and Shucun Sun

      Article first published online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12165

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      This paper makes an important step towards predictive ecology in a heterogeneous world by revealing the importance of the physical environment as a modifier of trait-based species interactions.

  4. Parasite and disease ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. ‘How to...’
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Molecular ecology
    8. Community ecology
    9. Macroecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Climate ecology
    1. Linking manipulative experiments to field data to test the dilution effect (pages 557–565)

      Matthew D. Venesky, Xuan Liu, Erin L. Sauer and Jason R. Rohr

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12159

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      This study of the dilution effect is among the first to link manipulative experiments, in which a potential dilution mechanism is supported, with analyses of field data on species richness, host identity, spatial autocorrelation and disease prevalence.

    2. Subtype diversity and reassortment potential for co-circulating avian influenza viruses at a diversity hot spot (pages 566–575)

      Heather D. Barton, Pejman Rohani, David E. Stallknecht, Justin Brown and John M. Drake

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12167

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      This study provides the first mechanistic description of how diversity affects evolution in a host–pathogen system with a mathematical model that shows the relationship between diversity and reassortment. Pathogen evolution is critical to understanding emerging infectious diseases, and these findings are relevant to understanding emergence in many zoonotic pathogens.

    3. An experimental test of host specialization in a ubiquitous polar ectoparasite: a role for adaptation? (pages 576–587)

      Muriel Dietrich, Elisa Lobato, Thierry Boulinier and Karen D. McCoy

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12170

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      This study describes a rare and important transplantation experiment highlighting the role of host adaptation in parasite diversification.

  5. Evolutionary ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. ‘How to...’
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Molecular ecology
    8. Community ecology
    9. Macroecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Climate ecology
    1. You have free access to this content
      Pollen mixing in pollen generalist solitary bees: a possible strategy to complement or mitigate unfavourable pollen properties? (pages 588–597)

      Michael Eckhardt, Mare Haider, Silvia Dorn and Andreas Müller

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12168

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      The larvae of a solitary bee species can benefit from the nutrient content of unfavourable pollen if such pollen is mixed with favourable pollen in their diet. Thus, pollen mixing in pollen generalist bees should also be considered as a possible strategy to exploit flowers with unfavourable pollen.

    2. Changes in predator community structure shifts the efficacy of two warning signals in Arctiid moths (pages 598–605)

      Ossi Nokelainen, Janne Valkonen, Carita Lindstedt and Johanna Mappes

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12169

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      This study provides the first experimental evidence that varying predator community composition can create mosaic selection for warning signals promoting colour polymorphism. This is an important step because data on which mechanisms really affect warning signal evolution in the wild are rare making findings of this work timely ones.

    3. Heterochrony in a complex world: disentangling environmental processes of facultative paedomorphosis in an amphibian (pages 606–615)

      Mathieu Denoël and Gentile F. Ficetola

      Article first published online: 6 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12173

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      This study indicates that heterochrony relies on more complex processes involving multiple ecological variables than usually thought. This exemplifies why heterochronic patterns occur in contrasted environments. On the other hand, the fast selection of alternative morphs shows that metamorphosis and paedomorphosis developmental modes could be easily disrupted in natural populations.

  6. Molecular ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. ‘How to...’
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Molecular ecology
    8. Community ecology
    9. Macroecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Climate ecology
    1. Does reduced mobility through fragmented landscapes explain patch extinction patterns for three honeyeaters? (pages 616–627)

      Katherine A. Harrisson, Alexandra Pavlova, J. Nevil Amos, James Q. Radford and Paul Sunnucks

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12172

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      The integration of molecular approaches, a multiple-species framework and a replicated landscape-scale study design, unusual in its extent, allowed for rigorous examination of the effects of habitat fragmentation on honeyeater population processes (e.g. mobility and gene flow) – not just patterns – at different temporal and spatial scales.

  7. Community ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. ‘How to...’
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Molecular ecology
    8. Community ecology
    9. Macroecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Climate ecology
    1. A test for community saturation along the Himalayan bird diversity gradient, based on within-species geographical variation (pages 628–638)

      Mousumi Ghosh-Harihar and Trevor D. Price

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12157

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      The idea that ecological communities are unsaturated is central to many explanations for latitudinal gradients in species diversity. This study devises a novel approach to test for community saturation. The authors show how patterns of within-species geographical variation make a clear, testable prediction with respect to community saturation.

    2. Specialization and phenological synchrony of plant–pollinator interactions along an altitudinal gradient (pages 639–650)

      Gita Benadi, Thomas Hovestadt, Hans-Joachim Poethke and Nico Blüthgen

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12158

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      Contrary to the results of a recent simulation study, this article shows that even relatively specialized pollinators are flexible in their choice of flowering plants and do not depend on phenological synchrony with particular plant species as floral resources. These results are highly relevant in the context of climate change.

    3. Determination of temperate bird–flower interactions as entangled mutualistic and antagonistic sub-networks: characterization at the network and species levels (pages 651–660)

      Tetsuro Yoshikawa and Yuji Isagi

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12161

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      The authors demonstrate that the whole bird–flower network comprises entangled mutualistic and antagonistic sub-networks, sharing considerable proportions of bird and plant assemblages, and these sub-networks differ in their structural properties. Understanding the interaction type and considering the behavioural plasticity of animals are of great importance for elucidating integrated network structures.

    4. Individual-based analyses reveal limited functional overlap in a coral reef fish community (pages 661–670)

      Simon J. Brandl and David R. Bellwood

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12171

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      This paper describes a novel approach to disentangle functional diversity using species’ realized functional niches. Using a multidimensional framework, the authors calculate the niche overlap between species and reveal surprisingly little redundancy in a herbivorous reef fish community. These results may change our understanding of herbivorous processes on coral reefs.

  8. Macroecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. ‘How to...’
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Molecular ecology
    8. Community ecology
    9. Macroecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Climate ecology
    1. Phylogenetically related and ecologically similar carnivores harbour similar parasite assemblages (pages 671–680)

      Shan Huang, Olaf R. P. Bininda-Emonds, Patrick R. Stephens, John L. Gittleman and Sonia Altizer

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12160

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      The authors show that the number of divergence events between host species is essential for predicting parasite assemblage similarity. Further, using a measure of host phylogenetic clustering that is independent of the number of host species infected, they show that many parasites, including those considered to be broad generalists, have host ranges significantly clustered on the host phylogeny.

  9. Behavioural ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. ‘How to...’
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Molecular ecology
    8. Community ecology
    9. Macroecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Climate ecology
    1. Individual-based measurements of light intensity provide new insights into the effects of artificial light at night on daily rhythms of urban-dwelling songbirds (pages 681–692)

      Davide M. Dominoni, Esther O. Carmona-Wagner, Michaela Hofmann, Bart Kranstauber and Jesko Partecke

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12150

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      Using miniature light-loggers, the authors measure the light intensity to which free-ranging urban and rural European blackbirds are exposed to at night. In addition, they correlate these measurements to the onset and offset of activity of each individual bird, recorded via automatic radio-telemetry.

    2. Fortune favours the bold: a higher predator reduces the impact of a native but not an invasive intermediate predator (pages 693–701)

      Daniel Barrios-O'Neill, Jaimie T. A. Dick, Mark C. Emmerson, Anthony Ricciardi, Hugh J. MacIsaac, Mhairi E. Alexander and Helene C. Bovy

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12155

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      This study demonstrates how the individual-level impacts of native and invasive predators translate to impacts in multi-predator contexts. The authors use a functional response-based approach to highlight the density-dependence of emergent effects, and show how the presence of a higher predator exacerbates the difference between the impacts of natives and invaders.

    3. Divergence in threat sensitivity among aquatic larvae of cryptic mosquito species (pages 702–711)

      Olivier Roux, Abdoulaye Diabaté and Frédéric Simard

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12163

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      Within the frameworks of ecological speciation and predation pressure, this study is the first of its kind to target subtle differences between incipient species, therefore placing this work at a new taxonomic level and at a decisive time in species diversification.

    4. Lasting effects of snow accumulation on summer performance of large herbivores in alpine ecosystems may not last (pages 712–719)

      Atle Mysterud and Gunnar Austrheim

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12166

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      One of the clearest predictions from the IPCC is that we can expect much less snow cover due to global warming in the 21st century. Here, the authors provide a new mechanistic pathway for how declining snow may affect future performance of large herbivores beyond the effect of plant phenology.

    5. Pulsed resources and the coupling between life-history strategies and exploration patterns in eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) (pages 720–728)

      Pierre-Olivier Montiglio, Dany Garant, Patrick Bergeron, Gabrielle Dubuc Messier and Denis Réale

      Article first published online: 6 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12174

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      The authors report how individual exploration predicts age at first reproduction and reproductive life history in a population of eastern chipmunks. They also show that pulsed fluctuations in food abundance, associated with beech mast, may maintain individual differences in exploration in this population. Picture credit: C. Couchoux

  10. Climate ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. ‘How to...’
    4. Trophic interactions
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Molecular ecology
    8. Community ecology
    9. Macroecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Climate ecology
    1. Changes in breeding phenology and population size of birds (pages 729–739)

      Peter O. Dunn and Anders P. Møller

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12162

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      Climate change is often associated with earlier breeding in birds, and this advancement could ultimately affect population size. The authors conduct a comparative analysis and find no connection between changes in laying date and recent trends in population size. They suggest factors other than mismatching may be influencing population trends.

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