Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 83 Issue 5

September 2014

Volume 83, Issue 5

Pages 1003–1244

  1. In Focus

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Physiological ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Demography
    6. Parasite and disease ecology
    7. Macroecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Evolutionary ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Community ecology
    12. Spatial ecology
    13. Corrigendum
    1. The evolutionary significance of latent reproductive rate in a long-lived vertebrate (pages 1003–1006)

      Emmanuelle Cam

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12277

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors use long-term data to assess the evolutionary significance of individual latent reproductive rate in female Weddell seals. They find evidence of a weak positive relationship between the latent reproductive rates of mothers and daughters, suggesting some degree of heritability in this trait. This is one of the handful of recent studies addressing the heritability of a latent life-history trait in wild vertebrates.

  2. Physiological ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Physiological ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Demography
    6. Parasite and disease ecology
    7. Macroecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Evolutionary ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Community ecology
    12. Spatial ecology
    13. Corrigendum
    1. The smell of good food: volatile infochemicals as resource quality indicators (pages 1007–1014)

      Jana Moelzner and Patrick Fink

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12220

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors demonstrate for the first time that an herbivorous consumer can evaluate a resource's dietary quality over a distance. The observed foraging behaviour clearly shows that gastropods are able to perceive and distinguish chemical cues released from a resource as food quality indicators. Credit: Dr. Lars Peters, www.blueseapictures.de.

  3. Population ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Physiological ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Demography
    6. Parasite and disease ecology
    7. Macroecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Evolutionary ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Community ecology
    12. Spatial ecology
    13. Corrigendum
    1. Immigrants are attracted by local pre-breeders and recruits in a seabird colony (pages 1015–1024)

      K. Lesley Szostek, Michael Schaub and Peter H. Becker

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12206

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors estimate annual immigration rates in a common tern colony, using Bayesian modelling based on long-term individual life-history data. They find that immigration is the most important driver of colony growth, and its driving force is young first-time breeders, attracted to the colony by the presence of potential mates.

    2. Ecological opportunities and intraspecific competition alter trophic niche specialization in an opportunistic stream predator (pages 1025–1034)

      Charlotte Evangelista, Anatole Boiche, Antoine Lecerf and Julien Cucherousset

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12208

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study describes how human-induced disturbances (i.e. forestry management), by modifying ecological opportunities, impact the trophic ecology of an aquatic predator. Based on longitudinal monitoring of individuals and stable isotope analyses, it provides a rare empirical evidence that trophic specialization can be indirectly driven by ecological opportunities through strengthened intraspecific competition.

    3. Life-history diversity and its importance to population stability and persistence of a migratory fish: steelhead in two large North American watersheds (pages 1035–1046)

      Jonathan W. Moore, Justin D. Yeakel, Dean Peard, Jeff Lough and Mark Beere

      Article first published online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12212

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors analyse life-history trajectories of an iconic migratory fish in large and relatively pristine watersheds, discovering an astonishing 36 different life histories. Via portfolio effects, this diversity increases stability in this era of rising variability.

    4. Dispersal-mediated effect of microhabitat availability and density dependence determine population dynamics of a forest floor web spider (pages 1047–1056)

      Mayura B. Takada and Tadashi Miyashita

      Article first published online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12213

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors provide novel integrative evidence that fragmentation paradigm and density-dependent paradigm in population dynamics could operate in a particular system, using populations of a web spider.

  4. Demography

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Physiological ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Demography
    6. Parasite and disease ecology
    7. Macroecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Evolutionary ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Community ecology
    12. Spatial ecology
    13. Corrigendum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Survival in macaroni penguins and the relative importance of different drivers: individual traits, predation pressure and environmental variability (pages 1057–1067)

      Catharine Horswill, Jason Matthiopoulos, Jonathan A. Green, Michael P. Meredith, Jaume Forcada, Helen Peat, Mark Preston, Phil N. Trathan and Norman Ratcliffe

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12229

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Understanding the factors that explain changes in survival rates is central to population ecology. This is the first seabird demography study to use mark–recapture modelling approaches to simultaneously consider and demonstrate the influence of multiple regulatory effects and assess their relative importance across different life stages.

  5. Parasite and disease ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Physiological ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Demography
    6. Parasite and disease ecology
    7. Macroecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Evolutionary ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Community ecology
    12. Spatial ecology
    13. Corrigendum
    1. Greater migratory propensity in hosts lowers pathogen transmission and impacts (pages 1068–1077)

      Richard J. Hall, Sonia Altizer and Rebecca A. Bartel

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12204

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This is the first theoretical demonstration that long-distance migration can lower pathogen transmission and impacts, with implications for predicting and managing pathogen threats in imperilled migratory species.

    2. Frequent and seasonally variable sublethal anthrax infections are accompanied by short-lived immunity in an endemic system (pages 1078–1090)

      Carrie A. Cizauskas, Steven E. Bellan, Wendy C. Turner, Russell E. Vance and Wayne M. Getz

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12207

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Here, the authors examine anthrax hosts in a natural system and find that herbivores are capable of surviving anthrax, with zebras contracting sublethal anthrax at a very high rate. The study also helps to establish more rigourous protocols for running and interpreting ELISAs, a very commonly used assay in immunological ecology.

    3. Predictors of malaria infection in a wild bird population: landscape-level analyses reveal climatic and anthropogenic factors (pages 1091–1102)

      Catalina Gonzalez-Quevedo, Richard G. Davies and David S. Richardson

      Article first published online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12214

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper explores the role of fine-scale environmental variation on the distribution of a wildlife disease. Interestingly, the authors find a key role for a climatic variable previously described as an important predictor of malaria, but also find an effect of anthropogenic variables.

    4. Heterogeneous hosts: how variation in host size, behaviour and immunity affects parasite aggregation (pages 1103–1112)

      Pieter T. J. Johnson and Jason T. Hoverman

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12215

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Despite the ubiquity of parasite aggregation, experimental studies investigating the proposed drivers of such variation or their interactions remain rare. By combining field surveys with controlled experiments, the authors show that only manipulations of host behaviour – and not size or immunity – reproduce infection heterogeneity comparable to field patterns.

    5. Ectoparasitism and stress hormones: strategy of host exploitation, common host–parasite history and energetics matter (pages 1113–1123)

      Justin R. St. Juliana, Irina S. Khokhlova, Nadja Wielebnowski, Burt P. Kotler and Boris R. Krasnov

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12217

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study is novel in investigating the impacts of ectoparasites on stress hormones in small mammals. The authors find that strategy of host exploitation, common host–parasite history and energetics all influence the stress hormones of a host.

  6. Macroecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Physiological ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Demography
    6. Parasite and disease ecology
    7. Macroecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Evolutionary ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Community ecology
    12. Spatial ecology
    13. Corrigendum
    1. Multiple dimensions of bat biodiversity along an extensive tropical elevational gradient (pages 1124–1136)

      Laura M. Cisneros, Kevin R. Burgio, Lindsay M. Dreiss, Brian T. Klingbeil, Bruce D. Patterson, Steven J. Presley and Michael R. Willig

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12201

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study demonstrates that species richness is not always an effective surrogate of phylogenetic or functional dimensions of biodiversity. Deviations of phylogenetic or functional dispersion from that expected based on species richness suggest that competitive exclusion and abiotic filtering operate simultaneously on different aspects of bat assemblages at high elevations. Photo credit: L.M. Cisneros.

  7. Trophic interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Physiological ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Demography
    6. Parasite and disease ecology
    7. Macroecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Evolutionary ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Community ecology
    12. Spatial ecology
    13. Corrigendum
    1. Let's go beyond taxonomy in diet description: testing a trait-based approach to prey–predator relationships (pages 1137–1148)

      Jérôme Spitz, Vincent Ridoux and Anik Brind'Amour

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12218

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Here the authors demonstrate the utility of a trait-based method that is that original for dietary data and opens a new avenue to investigate predator-prey relationships and aspects of prey selection of wild fauna

    2. A trophic cascade induced by predatory ants in a fig–fig wasp mutualism (pages 1149–1157)

      Bo Wang, Xiang-Zong Geng, Li-Bin Ma, James M. Cook and Rui-Wu Wang

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12219

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper reports a trophic cascade induced by weaver ants on a fig–fig wasp mutualism. We show that predation by weaver ants limits the success of the non-pollinating wasp and therefore indirectly benefits the mutualism by increasing the reproductive success of both the pollinator and the plant. Predation is therefore a key functional factor that shapes the community structure of a multi-species mutualistic system and determines its functioning.

  8. Evolutionary ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Physiological ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Demography
    6. Parasite and disease ecology
    7. Macroecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Evolutionary ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Community ecology
    12. Spatial ecology
    13. Corrigendum
    1. An evolutionary perspective on reproductive individual heterogeneity in a marine vertebrate (pages 1158–1168)

      Thierry Chambert, Jay J. Rotella and Robert A. Garrott

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12211

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study is the first to address the evolutionary consequences of individual reproductive heterogeneity in a long-lived vertebrate. Using Weddell seals as a model, the authors show that females producing more offspring do not trade off with the quality of their offspring and find evidence for heritability in female reproductive rates.

  9. Behavioural ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Physiological ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Demography
    6. Parasite and disease ecology
    7. Macroecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Evolutionary ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Community ecology
    12. Spatial ecology
    13. Corrigendum
    1. Evidence of localized resource depletion following a natural colonization event by a large marine predator (pages 1169–1177)

      Carey E. Kuhn, Jason D. Baker, Rodney G. Towell and Rolf R. Ream

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12202

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By taking advantage of a rare colonization event, this study examined the impact of population growth on the foraging behaviour of a large marine predator. As the population increase 4-fold, northern fur seals were required to allot increasing effort to obtain prey as a result of localized resource depletion.

    2. Habitat degradation is threatening reef replenishment by making fish fearless (pages 1178–1185)

      Oona M. Lönnstedt, Mark I. McCormick, Douglas P. Chivers and Maud C. O. Ferrari

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12209

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In one of the world's most biologically diverse ecosystems, coral reefs, climate change is causing coral degradation. The authors find that recruitment and replenishment of reef fish will be affected by coral death via predation-mediated changes, as fish in dead habitats fail to respond to predators with severe consequences for survival.

    3. Individual and sex-specific differences in intrinsic growth rate covary with consistent individual differences in behaviour (pages 1186–1195)

      Peter A. Biro, Bart Adriaenssens and Portia Sampson

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12210

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Why individuals within a given population consistently differ in behaviour is an important question, given the lability of behaviour. Here, the authors show that individual differences in intrinsic growth rate are a strong predictor of behavioural differences that persist over several months.

    4. The effect of fire on habitat selection of mammalian herbivores: the role of body size and vegetation characteristics (pages 1196–1205)

      Stephanie L. Eby, T. Michael Anderson, Emilian P. Mayemba and Mark E. Ritchie

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12221

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper is one of the first to intensively study reasons for herbivore preference of burned areas. Additionally, it explores how long impacts of burning affect herbivore distributions, which is important given the large roles that herbivores and fire play in savanna and grassland ecosystems.

  10. Community ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Physiological ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Demography
    6. Parasite and disease ecology
    7. Macroecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Evolutionary ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Community ecology
    12. Spatial ecology
    13. Corrigendum
    1. Linking phenological shifts to species interactions through size-mediated priority effects (pages 1206–1215)

      Nick L. Rasmussen, Benjamin G. Van Allen and Volker H. W. Rudolf

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12203

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Shifts in phenological timing can occur due to interannual variation in seasonal weather patterns as well as anthropogenic climate change, but the consequences for species interactions remain poorly understood. Using an experimental approach, this study demonstrates that phenological shifts can alter not only interaction strength but also demographic rates of species and community structure through a mechanism called size-mediated priority effects, in which individuals that arrive earlier can achieve a body size advantage over those that arrive later.

  11. Spatial ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Physiological ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Demography
    6. Parasite and disease ecology
    7. Macroecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Evolutionary ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Community ecology
    12. Spatial ecology
    13. Corrigendum
    1. A critical examination of indices of dynamic interaction for wildlife telemetry studies (pages 1216–1233)

      Jed A. Long, Trisalyn A. Nelson, Stephen L. Webb and Kenneth L. Gee

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12198

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors compare currently available techniques for detecting interactive behaviour – termed dynamic interaction-when multiple animals are tracked simultaneously (e.g. GPS collars). A recently developed metric for looking at local-level changes in interactive behaviour is highlighted.

    2. Using dynamic Brownian bridge movement modelling to measure temporal patterns of habitat selection (pages 1234–1243)

      Michael E. Byrne, J. Clint McCoy, Joseph W. Hinton, Michael J. Chamberlain and Bret A. Collier

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12205

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors use the dynamic Brownian bridge motion model to estimate space use of an animal between individual GPS telemetry locations based on movement behaviour and show how that information can be used to investigate fine-scale temporal variation in habitat use.

  12. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Physiological ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Demography
    6. Parasite and disease ecology
    7. Macroecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Evolutionary ecology
    10. Behavioural ecology
    11. Community ecology
    12. Spatial ecology
    13. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum (page 1244)

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12265

      This article corrects:

      Evidence-based control of canine rabies: a critical review of population density reduction

      Vol. 82, Issue 1, 6–14, Article first published online: 24 SEP 2012

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION