Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 83 Issue 6

November 2014

Volume 83, Issue 6

Pages 1245–1552

  1. In Focus

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Evolutionary ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Community ecology
    7. Behavioural ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Macroecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Life histories
    1. You have free access to this content
      Bringing animal personality research into the food web arena (pages 1245–1247)

      Gregor Kalinkat

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12284

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      This article discusses the paper published in this issue by Toscano & Griffen (2014) who, through synthesizing concepts from animal behaviour and food web ecology, demonstrate the importance of understanding animal personality and the effects of body size on predator–prey interactions. The results of this work will help to improve current models of predator–prey interactions and the impact of individual-level variation on quantitative food web dynamics.

  2. Evolutionary ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Evolutionary ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Community ecology
    7. Behavioural ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Macroecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Life histories
    1. Why is eusociality an almost exclusively terrestrial phenomenon? (pages 1248–1255)

      Graeme D. Ruxton, Stuart Humphries, Lesley J. Morrell and David M. Wilkinson

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12251

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      In this thought-provoking forum paper, the authors discuss the strange observation that while social insects such as ants, termites, bees and wasps play large roles in terrestrial ecosystems, truly social taxa are far less common in aquatic environments.

    2. Mate finding, Allee effects and selection for sex-biased dispersal (pages 1256–1267)

      Allison K. Shaw and Hanna Kokko

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12232

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      This article resolves contradicting predictions from the mate search and dispersal literatures about correlation between male and female dispersal and demonstrates that sex bias in dispersal depends on when mating occurs during the dispersal process.

    3. Temperature-dependent variation in alternative migratory tactics and its implications for fitness and population dynamics in a salmonid fish (pages 1268–1278)

      Kentaro Morita, Tsuyoshi Tamate, Mari Kuroki and Toru Nagasawa

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12240

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      This study showed that the proportion of male masu salmon exhibiting migratory behavior decreased with increasing temperature. Additionally, the occurrence of delayed age at migration decreased with increasing temperature. These responses to increased temperature are explained by an adaptation to maximize fitness.

    4. Does variation in the intensity and duration of predation drive evolutionary changes in senescence? (pages 1279–1288)

      Matthew R. Walsh, Deirdre Whittington and Melissa J. Walsh

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12247

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      This is a rare test of the evolutionary theory of senescence, evaluating the importance of predation on ageing and showing that increased mortality does not select for faster ageing. Such results challenge our current understanding of the importance of predation on senescence.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Special structures of hoopoe eggshells enhance the adhesion of symbiont-carrying uropygial secretion that increase hatching success (pages 1289–1301)

      Manuel Martín-Vivaldi, Juan J. Soler, Juan M. Peralta-Sánchez, Laura Arco, Antonio M. Martín-Platero, Manuel Martínez-Bueno, Magdalena Ruiz-Rodríguez and Eva Valdivia

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12243

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      This study provides strong evidence of a mutualistic association between hoopoes and antibiotic producing bacteria, whereby the bacteria protect embryos against infection.

    6. The number of competitor species is unlinked to sexual dimorphism (pages 1302–1312)

      Shai Meiri, Amy E. Kadison, Maria Novosolov, Panayiotis Pafilis, Johannes Foufopoulos, Yuval Itescu, Pasquale Raia and Daniel Pincheira-Donoso

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12248

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      Sexual size dimorphism within three lizard species does not change with the number of putative competitors they face on different-sized islands in the Aegean Sea. We found, counter to expected ecological theory, sexual dimorphism does not diminish as guilds acquire more species.

  3. Population ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Evolutionary ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Community ecology
    7. Behavioural ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Macroecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Life histories
    1. Body size, carry-over effects and survival in a seasonal environment: consequences for population dynamics (pages 1313–1321)

      Gustavo S. Betini, Cortland K. Griswold, Livia Prodan and D. Ryan Norris

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12225

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      Most populations live in seasonal environments, yet the implications of seasonality on population dynamics are not well understood. Here, we used a model system to show how variation in parental breeding density carries over to influence offspring survival during the non-breeding season and how this can stabilize long-term population dynamics.

    2. Year-round effects of climate on demographic parameters of an arctic-nesting goose species (pages 1322–1333)

      Louise van Oudenhove, Gilles Gauthier and Jean-Dominique Lebreton

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12230

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      Understanding how climate changes affect animal populations remains a major challenge, especially in arctic-nesting migratory birds exposed to different climatic regimes. With a 23-year data set, this study highlights how temperatures encountered throughout the annual cycle affect the vital rates of the greater snow geese.

    3. Effects of spatial structure of population size on the population dynamics of barnacles across their elevational range (pages 1334–1343)

      Keiichi Fukaya, Takehiro Okuda, Masahiro Nakaoka and Takashi Noda

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12234

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      This study explores the variability–range relationship of population size by analysing long-term data of intertidal barnacles collected over their vertical range. Results show a tendency that populations are variable at range margins due to increased stochastic fluctuation in growth rate, as well as an association between population size and its variability.

    4. Density-dependent intraspecific aggression regulates survival in northern Yellowstone wolves (Canis lupus) (pages 1344–1356)

      Sarah Cubaynes, Daniel R. MacNulty, Daniel R. Stahler, Kira A. Quimby, Douglas W. Smith and Tim Coulson

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12238

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      This article provides empirical support for the hypothesis that intrinsic density-dependent mechanisms might regulate territorial carnivore populations at high ungulate densities.

    5. Linking body mass and group dynamics in an obligate cooperative breeder (pages 1357–1366)

      Arpat Ozgul, Andrew W. Bateman, Sinead English, Tim Coulson and Tim H. Clutton-Brock

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12239

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      By applying an individual- and trait-based population model to an exceptional life-history data set, the authors reveal the mechanisms through which environmental and social factors affect the group dynamics of a cooperatively breeding mammal.

    6. Overcompensation and phase effects in a cyclic common vole population: between first and second-order cycles (pages 1367–1378)

      Frédéric Barraquand, Adrien Pinot, Nigel G. Yoccoz and Vincent Bretagnolle

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12257

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      The density-dependence of annual growth rates is crucial to explain population cycles. Nonlinear models show why the density of the year, rather than the density a year ago as usually assumed, is most important to common vole cyclic dynamics. It suggests in turn novel potential causes for common vole cycles.

  4. Parasite and disease ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Evolutionary ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Community ecology
    7. Behavioural ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Macroecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Life histories
    1. Disentangling the effects of exposure and susceptibility on transmission of the zoonotic parasite Schistosoma mansoni (pages 1379–1386)

      David J. Civitello and Jason R. Rohr

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12222

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      Here, the authors develop mechanistic disease transmission models to separate exposure and susceptibility and enhance predictions of the spread of a human zoonotic disease in its wildlife hosts. This approach could improve predictions of human risk and be applied to many host–parasite disease systems.

    2. Prevalence and beta diversity in avian malaria communities: host species is a better predictor than geography (pages 1387–1397)

      Elizabeth S. C. Scordato and Melissa R. Kardish

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12246

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      This paper uses measures of phylogenetic and community beta diversity to show that host species is a better predictor of malaria community turnover than site, providing no evidence for a distance–decay relationship in these parasite communities.

  5. Community ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Evolutionary ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Community ecology
    7. Behavioural ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Macroecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Life histories
    1. Ant functional responses along environmental gradients (pages 1398–1408)

      Xavier Arnan, Xim Cerdá and Javier Retana

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12227

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      Relationships among traits, function and the environment are poorly understood in animals, where large databases are hardly available. This study is one of the first to analyse changes in a large number of animal functional traits along wide and different environmental gradients concurrently.

    2. Community-level demographic consequences of urbanization: an ecological network approach (pages 1409–1417)

      Amanda D. Rodewald, Rudolf P. Rohr, Miguel A. Fortuna and Jordi Bascompte

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12224

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      This paper is the first to establish a link between population demography of several species and network structure. The authors demonstrate that demographic variation among populations can be explained only by using networks, not with traditional ecological predictors, including numbers of predators, landscape composition and habitat structure.

    3. Cheetahs and wild dogs show contrasting patterns of suppression by lions (pages 1418–1427)

      Alexandra Swanson, Tim Caro, Harriet Davies-Mostert, Michael G. L. Mills, David W. Macdonald, Markus Borner, Emmanuel Masenga and Craig Packer

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12231

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      African lions have contrasting effects on populations of cheetahs and wild dogs. Lions do not suppress cheetah populations despite inflicting considerable cub mortality, but their impacts on wild dogs are greater than previously supposed, explaining the disappearance of the iconic Serengeti dog population. Fine-scale avoidance behavior may allow apex-mesopredator coexistence.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Parasites and genetic diversity in an invasive bumblebee (pages 1428–1440)

      Catherine M. Jones and Mark J. F. Brown

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12235

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      Using an ecologically and economically important genus of pollinators as a model system, the authors ask how enemy release, at the level of parasite communities and real parasite impact, and functional genetic diversity, contribute to the invasion success of a non-native bumblebee in the United Kingdom.

    5. Exotic birds increase generalization and compensate for native bird decline in plant–frugivore assemblages (pages 1441–1450)

      Daniel García, Daniel Martínez, Daniel B. Stouffer and Jason M. Tylianakis

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12237

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      This study shows that the stronger the integration of exotic birds in the frugivore assemblages of New Zealand, the higher the degree of generalization of plant–frugivore networks. By diversifying the frugivore guild for native plants, exotic birds may increase the resilience of seed dispersal against native bird extinction (Artwork by Daniel Martinez).

    6. Trait-based diet selection: prey behaviour and morphology predict vulnerability to predation in reef fish communities (pages 1451–1460)

      Stephanie J. Green and Isabelle M. Côté

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12250

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      The authors describe a novel functional approach to studying diet selection and show that several behavioural and morphological traits exhibited by Caribbean reef fishes heighten vulnerability to predation by invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish nearly 200%.

    7. Allometric scaling of indirect effects: body size ratios predict non-consumptive effects in multi-predator systems (pages 1461–1468)

      Lauren Krenek and Volker H. W. Rudolf

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12254

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      Results indicate that models which assume that predators have independent effects on their prey are particularly likely to make erroneous predictions when predators differ substantially in size, but simple allometric relationships of NCEs could be used to correct this bias.

  6. Behavioural ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Evolutionary ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Community ecology
    7. Behavioural ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Macroecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Life histories
    1. You have free access to this content
      Trait-mediated functional responses: predator behavioural type mediates prey consumption (pages 1469–1477)

      Benjamin J. Toscano and Blaine D. Griffen

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12236

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      Consistent individual variation in behaviour (i.e. behavioural types) is ubiquitous in predator populations, but the effects of behavioural types on the functional response remain uninvestigated. This study demonstrates size-dependent effects of individual crab activity level on the crab functional response to mussel prey density.

    2. Predator avoidance during reproduction: diel movements by spawning sockeye salmon between stream and lake habitats (pages 1478–1489)

      Kale T. Bentley, Daniel E. Schindler, Timothy J. Cline, Jonathan B. Armstrong, Daniel Macias, Lindsy R. Ciepiela and Ray Hilborn

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12223

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      Animals often face habitat-mediated trade-offs between reproductive success and predation risk. This study provides one of the first examples of individuals exploiting fine-scale habitat heterogeneity during reproduction through daily cyclic movements, which appears to be a strategy used by salmon to reduce predation risk by their principal predator, brown bears.

    3. Ecological divergence among colour morphs mediated by changes in spatial network structure associated with disturbance (pages 1490–1500)

      Matthew S. Lattanzio and Donald B. Miles

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12252

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      Our study provides unique insight into how environmental variation resulting from disturbance may interact with variation in individual behaviour to influence the spatial structuring of animal populations. We highlight some of the key social and ecological ramifications of this interaction for populations in resource-limited habitats.

  7. Trophic interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Evolutionary ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Community ecology
    7. Behavioural ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Macroecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Life histories
    1. Dual fuels: intra-annual variation in the relative importance of benthic and pelagic resources to maintenance, growth and reproduction in a generalist salmonid fish (pages 1501–1512)

      Brian Hayden, Chris Harrod and Kimmo K. Kahilainen

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12233

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      This study highlights the dual importance of benthic invertebrates, which fuel winter survival, and pelagic zooplankton, which fuels summer growth, to the annual development of generalist fish. These results represent an important contribution to the ongoing debate regarding the relative importance of benthic and pelagic productivity to lake food webs.

  8. Physiological ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Evolutionary ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Community ecology
    7. Behavioural ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Macroecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Life histories
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Growth trajectory influences temperature preference in fish through an effect on metabolic rate (pages 1513–1522)

      Shaun S. Killen

      Article first published online: 17 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12244

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      This study demonstrates for the first time that dietary history and growth trajectory influence preferred temperatures of fish, with the underlying cause being the effect of compensatory growth on individual metabolic rate. As a consequence, even in regularly growing fish, increased resting metabolic demand causes a preference for cooler environments

  9. Macroecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Evolutionary ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Community ecology
    7. Behavioural ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Macroecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Life histories
    1. Forest structure drives global diversity of primates (pages 1523–1530)

      Sidney F. Gouveia, Fabricio Villalobos, Ricardo Dobrovolski, Raone Beltrão-Mendes and Stephen F. Ferrari

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12241

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      This study provides a novel account on the likely causes of the global pattern of primate species richness, namely the vertical forest structure, thus challenging previous hypothesis based on levels of rainfall or productivity.

  10. Spatial ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Evolutionary ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Community ecology
    7. Behavioural ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Macroecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Life histories
    1. Variation in abundance of nectarivorous birds: does a competitive despot interfere with flower tracking? (pages 1531–1541)

      Joanne M. Bennett, Rohan H. Clarke, James R. Thomson and Ralph Mac Nally

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12245

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      Nectarivores track spatial and temporal variation in flowering but altered patterns of interspecific competition, driven by fragmentation and climate-induced vegetation degradation, deflect the distribution of small-bodied nectarivorous birds from an ‘ideal free distribution’ to an ‘ideal despotic distribution’.

  11. Life histories

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Evolutionary ecology
    4. Population ecology
    5. Parasite and disease ecology
    6. Community ecology
    7. Behavioural ecology
    8. Trophic interactions
    9. Physiological ecology
    10. Macroecology
    11. Spatial ecology
    12. Life histories
    1. Multi-taxa trait and functional responses to physical disturbance (pages 1542–1552)

      Scott M. Pedley and Paul M. Dolman

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12249

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      This is the first study to contrast trait responses from two diverse terrestrial arthropod groups to those of vascular plants, along a single environmental gradient. The authors show that generalizations of trait response across taxa should be cautious as responses vary among taxa.

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