Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 84 Issue 2

March 2015

Volume 84, Issue 2

Pages 323–585

  1. In Focus

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Community ecology
    5. Trophic interactions
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
    1. The adaptive potential of maternal stress exposure in regulating population dynamics (pages 323–325)

      Michael J. Sheriff

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12334

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      This article focuses on the study by Bian et al. (2015) and in doing so discusses how maternal stress programmes offspring phenotypes with direct consequences for population dynamics. It also provides an integrative life-history framework necessary to fully understand the impact of maternal stress exposure.

  2. Population ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Community ecology
    5. Trophic interactions
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
    1. Maternal effects and population regulation: maternal density-induced reproduction suppression impairs offspring capacity in response to immediate environment in root voles Microtus oeconomus (pages 326–336)

      Jiang-Hui Bian, Shou-Yang Du, Yan Wu, Yi-Fan Cao, Xu-Heng Nie, Hui He and Zhi-Bing You

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12307

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      The authors found that intrinsic state alterations induced by maternal stress impair offspring capacity in response to immediate environment, and these alterations are likely mediated by maternal stress system. The maladaptive reproduction suppression seen in HL group suggests intrinsic population density as one of ecological factors generating delayed density-dependent effects.

    2. Robust estimates of environmental effects on population vital rates: an integrated capture–recapture model of seasonal brook trout growth, survival and movement in a stream network (pages 337–352)

      Benjamin H. Letcher, Paul Schueller, Ronald D. Bassar, Keith H. Nislow, Jason A. Coombs, Krzysztof Sakrejda, Michael Morrissey, Douglas B. Sigourney, Andrew R. Whiteley, Matthew J. O'Donnell and Todd L. Dubreuil

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12308

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      Robust estimates of the effects of environmental change on populations are critical to effective management. The authors provide an integrated modeling approach that can take full advantage of detailed, individual-based field data and use the model to identify key pathways of environmental effects.

  3. Community ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Community ecology
    5. Trophic interactions
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
    1. Changes in host–parasitoid food web structure with elevation (pages 353–363)

      Sarah C. Maunsell, Roger L. Kitching, Chris J. Burwell and Rebecca J. Morris

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12285

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      This is the first study to show elevational changes in quantitative host-parasitoid food web structure, indicating that the way in which species interact is altered by the changes in environmental conditions along elevational gradients. These findings have important implications for predicting how insect communities may respond to climate change.

    2. Phylogenetic diversity and co-evolutionary signals among trophic levels change across a habitat edge (pages 364–372)

      Guadalupe Peralta, Carol M. Frost, Raphael K. Didham, Arvind Varsani and Jason M. Tylianakis

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12296

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      This study provides the first empirical evidence that phylogenetic diversity responds differently across a habitat edge gradient depending on the trophic level considered, and that the signal of coevolution between higher trophic levels (measured as phylogenetic congruence among interacting species) can also be affected by a change in land use.

    3. Season-specific and guild-specific effects of anthropogenic landscape modification on metacommunity structure of tropical bats (pages 373–385)

      Laura M. Cisneros, Matthew E. Fagan and Michael R. Willig

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12299

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      This study is the first to evaluate multiple metacommunity structures (meso-scale structure) in human-modified landscapes. This approach revealed that bat metacommunities were likely structured by differential resource use or interspecific relationships. Furthermore, the interaction between landscape characteristics and seasonal variation in resources resulted in season-specific and guild-specific distributional patterns

    4. Assembly patterns of mixed-species avian flocks in the Andes (pages 386–395)

      Gabriel J. Colorado and Amanda D. Rodewald

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12300

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      This paper makes a novel contribution by applying principles of community assembly, in particular assembly rules, to study patterns of aggregation in social systems in birds (namely mixed-species bird flocks). By evaluating several assembly models, findings suggest that deterministic factors associated to competitive interactions are important contributors to mixed-species flock assemblages.

    5. Linking niche theory to ecological impacts of successful invaders: insights from resource fluctuation-specialist herbivore interactions (pages 396–406)

      Cindy Gidoin, Lionel Roques and Thomas Boivin

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12303

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      The authors use long-term field observations combined with mechanistic-statistical modelling to assess how fluctuation-dependent and fluctuation-independent mechanisms govern the long-term impacts of biological invasions. They demonstrate that species differences can have a greater influence on interspecific competition outcomes than a fluctuating resource within animal communities.

    6. Hot spots of mutualistic networks (pages 407–413)

      Luis J. Gilarranz, Malena Sabatino, Marcelo A. Aizen and Jordi Bascompte

      Article first published online: 17 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12304

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      In this paper, Gilarranz and colleagues unveil the significant role played by the spatial structure of the landscape in shaping the networks of interactions between species. Their work provides further understanding of the spatial distribution of ecosystem services that help to stabilize ecological communities.

    7. Do intraspecific or interspecific interactions determine responses to predators feeding on a shared size-structured prey community? (pages 414–426)

      Hanna ten Brink, Abul Kalam Azad Mazumdar, Joseph Huddart, Lennart Persson and Tom C. Cameron

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12305

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      How predators interact with each other, via their shared impacts of prey populations is a key question to understand what impacts humans have on natural environments as we continue to exploit top predators and large herbivores for food. This study empirically tests a new theory that links the health of animal communities to positive indirect interactions between predators that differ in size or prey preferences. We find no evidence for such positive facilitative interactions and instead find predators that differ in size are more likely to eat each other.

    8. Elements of regional beetle faunas: faunal variation and compositional breakpoints along climate, land cover and geographical gradients (pages 427–441)

      Jani Heino and Janne Alahuhta

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12287

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      Many biogeographical and macroecological studies neglect developments in the statistical methods of community ecology, examining basically the same questions, i.e., how assemblages are structured and which patterns they show. The novelty of our paper lies in the application of community ecology methods to understand large-scale faunal patterns of beetles.

  4. Trophic interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Community ecology
    5. Trophic interactions
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
    1. Ant–caterpillar antagonism at the community level: interhabitat variation of tritrophic interactions in a neotropical savanna (pages 442–452)

      Sebastián F. Sendoya and Paulo S. Oliveira

      Article first published online: 27 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12286

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      Ants are major predators of insect herbivores in tropical habitats. In the Brazilian savanna, negative effects by predatory ants on herbivores (caterpillars) are detectable at the community level, affecting patterns of host plant use by lepidopteran communities. The study highlights the importance of a tritrophic perspective in this ant-rich environment.

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      Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies (pages 453–463)

      Rachel A. Paterson, Jaimie T. A. Dick, Daniel W. Pritchard, Marilyn Ennis, Melanie J. Hatcher and Alison M. Dunn

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12292

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      In this study the authors integrated functional responses within a four-species community module approach (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to reflect patterns of field impact and reveal context dependencies of parasitism and higher-order predators.

  5. Evolutionary ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Community ecology
    5. Trophic interactions
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
    1. Diapause induction and relaxed selection on alternative developmental pathways in a butterfly (pages 464–472)

      Inger M. Aalberg Haugen and Karl Gotthard

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12291

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      In this paper field and experimental data from five Swedish populations of Pararge aegeria are used to investigate latitudinal variation in voltinism, local adaptation in the diapause switch, and effects of relaxed selection on pathway-specific regulation of life-history traits and sexual dimorphism in larval development.

    2. Persistent sex-by-environment effects on offspring fitness and sex-ratio adjustment in a wild bird population (pages 473–486)

      E. Keith Bowers, Charles F. Thompson and Scott K. Sakaluk

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12294

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      Sex-specific sibling rivalry and sensitivity to the quality of the rearing environment favours sex-ratio adjustment by parents. At the same time, however, increased sensitivity of males to these environmental conditions reduces the fitness returns from highly male-biased broods and, thus, the extent of sex-ratio adjustment in wild populations.

  6. Parasite and disease ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Community ecology
    5. Trophic interactions
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
    1. Drivers of parasite sharing among Neotropical freshwater fishes (pages 487–497)

      Mariana P. Braga, Emanuel Razzolini and Walter A. Boeger

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12298

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      In this study, the factors that influence broad patterns of parasite sharing were investigated, including phylogenetic relationships, environmental preferences, biological traits and the geographic distribution of host species. The importance of evolutionary history on ecological associations is highlighted, with implications for emerging infectious diseases, biological invasions and biotic responses to climate change.

    2. The consequences of co-infections for parasite transmission in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (pages 498–508)

      Alison B. Duncan, Philip Agnew, Valérie Noel and Yannis Michalakis

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12302

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      This paper investigates the effect of the abiotic food environment on parasite transmission in co-infections comprising two different microsporidian parasites in the mosquito host Aedes aegypti. The authors show that both parasites suffer reduced transmission in co-infections compared to corresponding single infections, but one parasite considerably more than the other. The impact of low food availability further reduced transmission, but did not modify the effect of co-infection.

  7. Behavioural ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. In Focus
    3. Population ecology
    4. Community ecology
    5. Trophic interactions
    6. Evolutionary ecology
    7. Parasite and disease ecology
    8. Behavioural ecology
    1. Phantom alternatives influence food preferences in the eastern honeybee Apis cerana (pages 509–517)

      Ken Tan, Shihao Dong, Xiwen Liu, Weiweng Chen, Yuchong Wang, Benjamin P. Oldroyd and Tanya Latty

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12288

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      Our paper demonstrates that bees which encounter ‘sold-out’ feeders are more likely to select alternative feeders which have similar characteristics to the sold-out alternative. This is the first demonstration of the ‘phantom alternative’ effect in an insect.

    2. Spatial patterns of extra-pair paternity: beyond paternity gains and losses (pages 518–531)

      Lotte Schlicht, Mihai Valcu and Bart Kempenaers

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12293

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      This paper presents a novel approach for analysing behaviours that arise from interactions of two individuals, for example extra-pair behaviour. It takes into account the spatial setting of the involved individuals and both individuals’ characteristics and neighbourhoods. The paper demonstrates this using a case study on extra-pair paternity in blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus).

    3. Latitudinal and photic effects on diel foraging and predation risk in freshwater pelagic ecosystems (pages 532–544)

      Adam G. Hansen and David A. Beauchamp

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12295

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      This study asks: how does natural variation in photic conditions shape the foraging-risk environment for visually feeding planktivores and piscivores in freshwater pelagic ecosystems? Authors show that diel-seasonal foraging and predation risk in these ecosystems changes considerably with latitude, turbidity and cloud cover. These changes alter the structure of pelagic predator–prey interactions, and in turn, the broader role of pelagic consumers in habitat coupling in lakes.

    4. Density-dependent habitat selection of spawning Chinook salmon: broad-scale evidence and implications (pages 545–553)

      Matthew R. Falcy

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12297

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      Taking 26 years of data the author of this study uses novel applications of modelling techniques to assess mechanisms of habitat selection by spawning Chinook salmon. These techniques have important uses in the emerging field of eco-evolutionary dynamics.

    5. Moving on with foraging theory: incorporating movement decisions into the functional response of a gregarious shorebird (pages 554–564)

      Jan A. van Gils, Matthijs van der Geest, Brecht De Meulenaer, Hanneke Gillis, Theunis Piersma and Eelke O. Folmer

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12301

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      The authors integrate aspects of movement ecology with consumer-resource theory by developing a multi-state functional response model, which is applied to free-ranging molluscivore shorebirds. Explicitly adding movement behavior to functional response models helps to better understand foraging distributions and foraging processes such as area-restricted search and cryptic interference.

    6. Field measurements give biased estimates of functional response parameters, but help explain foraging distributions (pages 565–575)

      Sjoerd Duijns, Ineke E. Knot, Theunis Piersma and Jan A. van Gils

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12309

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      In the experimental setting, female bar-tailed godwits (Limosa lapponica) obeyed both assumptions of the type II functional response. This could not be confirmed in a field-based study, as the levelling off of intake rate at higher food densities was caused by a digestive constraint.

    7. Hidden semi-Markov models reveal multiphasic movement of the endangered Florida panther (pages 576–585)

      Madelon van de Kerk, David P. Onorato, Marc A. Criffield, Benjamin M. Bolker, Ben C. Augustine, Scott A. McKinley and Madan K. Oli

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12290

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      By applying hidden semi-Markov models and the Viterbi algorithm to long-term GPS telemetry data, authors show that differences in movement patterns of male and female Florida panthers are caused by sex-specific differences in diurnal patterns of state occupancy and sex-specific differences in state-specific movement parameters, whereas the differences between females with and without dependent kittens were caused solely by variation in state occupancy. Photo credit: Tim Donovan, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

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