Health Disparities of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: What Do We Know? What Do We Do?

Authors

  • Gloria L. Krahn,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA
    • Correspondence

      Any correspondence should be directed to Gloria L. Krahn, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 404-498-6743, 1600 Clifton Rd NE NS E88, Atlanta GA 30333, USA (e-mail: gfk2@cdc.gov).

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  • Michael H. Fox

    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA
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  • Portions of this article were presented as a keynote address at the International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual disabilities entitled: ‘Health Disparities of People with Intellectual Disabilities: What Do We Know? What Do We Do?’ Halifax, Canada, 10 July 2012.
  • The findings and conclusions in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Abstract

Background

Recent attention to health of people with intellectual disabilities has used a health disparities framework. Building on historical context, the paper summarizes what is known about health disparities from reports and research and provide direction on what to do to reduce these disparities among adults with intellectual disabilities.

Methods

The present authors examined literature from 2002 to 2011 on health disparities and people with disabilities looking for broad themes on documenting disparities and on research approaches and methods.

Results

Multiple countries published reports on health of people with intellectual disabilities. Researchers summarized existing research within a health disparities framework. A number of promising methodologies are identified such as health services research, health indicators, enhanced surveillance and mixed-methods.

Conclusions

Strategies to reduce health disparities include use of data to educate decision makers, attention to social determinants and a life-course model and emphasis on leveraging inclusion in mainstream services where possible.

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