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Examining attitudes, beliefs, and intentions regarding the use of exercise as punishment in physical education and sport: an application of the theory of reasoned action

Authors


Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Lydia J. Burak, 224 Tinsley Center, MAHPLS Department, Bridgewater State University, 325 Plymouth Street, Bridgewater, MA 02325, USA. E-mail: Lburak@bridgew.edu

Abstract

Although the use of exercise as punishment appears to be pervasive among physical education teachers and coaches, it has not been systematically examined. The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences, attitudes, intentions, and beliefs of college physical education majors regarding the use of exercise as punishment, using the framework of the theory of reasoned action. Surveys were completed by 345 students enrolled in 35 physical education classes. More than 90% of the study participants reported that their coaches used exercise as punishment, and 43% indicated their physical education teachers used exercise to punish or manage behavior. The constructs of the theory of reasoned action explained nearly 70% of the variance in participants' intentions to use exercise as punishment.

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