The work–family interface among school psychologists and related school personnel: a test of role conflict and expansionist theories

Authors


  • This research was completed during a sabbatical leave awarded to the first author by Georgian Court University.

Abstract

The purpose was to test of the utility of role conflict and expansionist theories in explaining the work–family interface using psychometrically sound instruments. Participants (n = 74) responded to measures of work–family conflict, work-related stress, and role quality. In support of the expansionist theory, results indicated that the quality of the life roles was a better predictor of both work–family conflict and work-related stress than was the number of life roles. For both, results indicated that as quality of the work role increased, work–family conflict and work-related stress decreased. The implications for the research on the work–family life interface and attracting and retaining the most qualified school psychologists are discussed.

Ancillary