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Predicting land use voting behavior: expanding our understanding of the influence of attitudes and social norms

Authors

  • Erin K. Maloney,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    • Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Erin K. Maloney, Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, 3620 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. E-mail: emaloney@asc.upenn.edu

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  • Maria K. Lapinski,

    1. College of Communication Arts and Sciences, Michigan State University
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Communication and Michigan AgBio Research, Michigan State University and Lindsay Neuberger, Nicholson School of Communication, University of Central Florida
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  • Lindsay Neuberger

    1. College of Communication Arts and Sciences, Michigan State University
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Abstract

Voting to tax oneself in the current economic climate seems improbable. Framed in theories of normative influence and behavior change, this study tests the factors that predict voting for a county-level millage (i.e., tax) to fund land preservation. Behavioral beliefs that contribute to people's attitudes toward the millage are identified and a model is tested with an expanded normative component. Results indicate that attitudes and subjective norms significantly predict voting intentions, and injunctive norms (i.e., people's perceptions of others' approval of taking an action) add significantly to the model's predictive power. Findings are reinforced by election results in which the millage proposal passed and can contribute to the applied literature by identifying social-psychological factors that can be targeted with campaign messages.

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