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Testing an extended theory of planned behavior to predict young people's intentions to join a bone marrow donor registry

Authors


Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Melissa K. Hyde, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, 176 Messines Ridge Road, Mt Gravatt, Queensland 4122. E-mail: melissa.hyde@griffith.edu.au

Abstract

An extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) was used to understand the factors, particularly control perceptions and affective reactions, given conflicting findings in previous research, informing younger people's intentions to join a bone marrow registry. Participants (N = 174) completed attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control (PBC), moral norm, anticipated regret, self-identity, and intention items for registering. The extended TPB (except PBC) explained 67.2% of variance in intention. Further testing is needed as to the volitional nature of registering. Moral norm, anticipated regret, and self-identity are likely intervention targets for increasing younger people's bone marrow registry participation.

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