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Internet and Facebook related images affect the perception of time

Authors

  • Lazaros Gonidis,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Psychology, Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience and Cognitive Systems, University of Kent, Canterbury
    • Correspondence Lazaros Gonidis, School of Psychology, Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience and Cognitive Systems, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NP. Email: lg389@kent.ac.uk

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  • Dinkar Sharma

    1. School of Psychology, Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience and Cognitive Systems, University of Kent, Canterbury
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Abstract

Even though there is a wealth of research on addiction and implicit measures, the effects of addiction on time perception are still unclear. Internal clock models separate the effects of attention and arousal which could have important implications for addiction research. This study investigated whether Internet related stimuli can lead to distorted time perception. We found evidence that Internet and Facebook related stimuli can distort time perception due to attention and arousal related mechanisms. This highlights that Facebook related stimuli lead to an overestimation of time compared to Internet related stimuli, and both Facebook and Internet related stimuli were associated with better discriminability of time compared to matched neutral stimuli. Implications of these findings on addiction are discussed.

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