Speech-Induced Atrial Tachycardia: An Unusual Presentation of Supraventricular Tachycardia

Authors

  • NADA B. MEMON M.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas, USA
    • Address for correspondence: Nada B. Memon, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.H.R.S., University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 6431 Fannin Street, MSB 1.246, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Fax: 713-500-6556; E-mail: nbmemon@yahoo.com

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  • DAVID F. BRICENO M.D.,

    1. Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas, USA
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  • DIEGO TORRES-RUSSOTTO M.D.,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE
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  • JANE CHEN M.D.,

    1. Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
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  • TIMOTHY W. SMITH D.Phil., M.D.

    1. Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
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  • No disclosures.

Speech-Induced Atrial Tachycardia

A 63-year-old male radio announcer was admitted with a narrow complex, long RP tachycardia. While in the awake state, the patient spoke in his radio voice, initiating and maintaining the tachycardia. Three-dimensional electroanatomic mapping during electrophysiology study localized the tachycardia to the ostium of the right superior pulmonary vein. After single radiofrequency energy application, no further arrhythmias were inducible with speech. At more than 1 year of follow-up, the patient had no recurrences and continues to work as a radio announcer.

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