Mesenchymal stem cells in acute lung injury: are they ready for translational medicine?

Authors

  • Feng Xu,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China
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  • Yue Hu,

    1. Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China
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  • Jiebai Zhou,

    1. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University Medical School, Shanghai, China
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  • Xiangdong Wang

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University Medical School, Shanghai, China
    • Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China
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Correspondence to: Feng XU, M.D., Ph.D., Assoc Prof, Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, 310009, China.

Tel.: +86 571 87784583

Fax: +86 571 87784571

E-mail: xufeng99@yahoo.com

Xiangdong WANG, MD, PhD, Prof, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University Medical School, Shanghai, 200032, China.

Tel.: +86 21 64041990 5420

Fax: +86 21 54961729

E-mail: Xiangdong.wang@clintransmed.org

Abstract

Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe clinical condition responsible for high mortality and the development of multiple organ dysfunctions, because of the lack of specific and effective therapies for ALI. Increasing evidence from pre-clinical studies supports preventive and therapeutic effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, also called mesenchymal stromal cells) in ALI/ARDS (acute respiratory distress syndrome). Therapeutic effects of MSCs were noticed in various delivery approaches (systemic, local, or other locations), multiple origins (bone marrow or other tissues), or different schedules of administrations (before or after the challenges). MSCs could reduce the over-production of inflammatory mediators, leucocyte infiltration, tissue injury and pulmonary failure, and produce a number of benefit factors through interaction with other cells in the process of lung tissue repair. Thus, it is necessary to establish guidelines, standard operating procedures and evaluation criteria for translating MSC-based therapies into clinical application for patients with ALI.

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