Periodontal repair in dogs: space-provision supports alveolar bone and cementum formation

Authors

  • Hsien-Chung Chiu,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory for Applied Periodontal and Craniofacial Regeneration (LAPCR), Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA, USA
    • Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, National Defense Medical Center and Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC
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    • Equally contributing authors.

  • E-Chin Shen,

    1. Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, National Defense Medical Center and Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC
    2. Department of Dentistry, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Taipei Branch, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC
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  • Shu-Jiun Lin,

    1. Department of Dentistry, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC
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  • Cristiano Susin,

    1. Laboratory for Applied Periodontal and Craniofacial Regeneration (LAPCR), Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA, USA
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  • Ulf M. E. Wikesjö,

    1. Laboratory for Applied Periodontal and Craniofacial Regeneration (LAPCR), Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA, USA
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  • Earl Fu

    1. Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, National Defense Medical Center and Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC
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    • Equally contributing authors.


  • Conflict of interest and source of funding statement

    The research reported herein was supported in part by the Tri-Service General Hospital, Republic of China. The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Address:

Hsien-Chung Chiu

National Defense Medical Center

PO Box 90048-507, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC

E-mail: d1121@mail.ndmctsgh.edu.tw

Abstract

Objective

Clinical criteria for periodontal wound healing/regeneration include wound stability, space-provision and conditions for primary intention healing. However, wound stability/space-provision may be difficult to obtain in non-contained periodontal defects. The objective of this study was to; using a limited, space-providing device as a conduit, evaluate a concept of space-provision sans tissue occlusion for periodontal wound healing/regeneration.

Methods

Bilateral, critical-size, supraalveolar, periodontal defects were created in eight young adult Beagle dogs. One jaw quadrant received a limited, space-providing titanium mesh device, the contra-lateral jaw quadrant served as sham-surgery control followed by submerged wound closure for primary intention healing. The animals were euthanized at 8 weeks for histometric analysis of the surgical sites.

Results

Clinical healing was generally uneventful; minor late exposures observed for some defects. Experimental sites exhibited significantly enhanced mean (±SE) bone and cementum regeneration compared with control (1.10 ± 0.20 and 1.32 ± 0.10 mm versus 0.34 ± 0.18 and 0.66 ± 0.15 mm; < 0.01). A cellular mixed (extrinsic/intrinsic) fibre cementum and functionally oriented collagen fibres were routinely observed. Wound exposures were significantly associated with reduced bone formation (< 0.05).

Conclusions

Using a limited, space-providing device to support periodontal wound healing/regeneration appears a promising clinical approach for non-contained periodontal defects.

Ancillary