Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics

Cover image for Vol. 38 Issue 6

December 2013

Volume 38, Issue 6

Pages 433–532

  1. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Article
    3. Original Articles
    4. Pharmacokinetics
    5. Case Reports
    1. You have free access to this content
  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Article
    3. Original Articles
    4. Pharmacokinetics
    5. Case Reports
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Effects of food on the pharmacokinetics of ponatinib in healthy subjects (pages 440–444)

      N. I. Narasimhan, D. J. Dorer, K. Niland, F. Haluska and Daryl Sonnichsen

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jcpt.12082

    2. Augmented renal clearance – an evolving risk factor to consider during the treatment with vancomycin (pages 462–467)

      R. Minkutė, V. Briedis, R. Steponavičiūtė, A. Vitkauskienė and R. Mačiulaitis

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jcpt.12088

    3. Percutaneous coronary intervention vs. optimal medical therapy – the other side of the coin: medication adherence (pages 476–479)

      C. Kocas, O. Abaci, V. Oktay, U. Coskun, C. Bostan, A. Yildiz, A. Arat Ozkan, T. Gurmen and M. Ersanli

      Article first published online: 30 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jcpt.12091

    4. Using formative evaluation to improve uptake of a web-based tool to support antimicrobial stewardship (pages 490–497)

      S. T. R. Zaidi and K. A. Thursky

      Article first published online: 29 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jcpt.12093

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      This study evaluated the impact of a formative evaluation on the uptake of a web-based antibiotic computerized decision support system (CDSS) by clinicians at a university teaching hospital. An automated log of the clinicians' use of antibiotic CDSS was generated before and after the formative evaluation. Interviews of 42 clinicians identified several barriers related to contents and implementation strategy of the antibiotic CDSS. Important differences were observed between senior and junior doctors about various aspects of the antibiotic restriction strategy and applicability of antibiotic CDSS in specialized clinical areas. The formative evaluation approach during the implementation period of the studied antibiotic CDSS increased clinicians' uptake of the system.

    5. Absence of effect of SLC22A2 genotype on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in oesophageal cancer patients receiving cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil: report of results discordant with those of earlier studies (pages 498–503)

      Y. Hinai, S. Motoyama, T. Niioka and M. Miura

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jcpt.12097

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      Cancer patients treated with cisplatin chemotherapy frequently experience drug-induced nephrotoxicity. Clinical studies using a single chemotherapeutic regimen or large sample sizes for patients with the SLC22A2 808T allele have not been reported. The change rate of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was used for the evaluation of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The change rate of eGFR for each patient receiving FP chemotherapy was calculated according to the following formula: change rate = (pre-chemotherapy – post-chemotherapy)/pre-chemotherapy. The eGFR after FP chemotherapy was significantly lower than that before chemotherapy, and the mean difference in eGFR was 25·7 mL/min (P < 0·01). Our present study was estimated with a single chemotherapeutic regimen, eGFR, is calculated using serum creatinine, age, and the sex of the patient, and sample sizes of 25 patients with SLC22A2 808T allele.

    6. Estimation of CYP2D6*10 genotypes on citalopram disposition in Chinese subjects by population pharmacokinetic assay (pages 504–511)

      B. Chen, Y. Xu, T. Jiang, R. Feng, J. Sun, W. Zhang, W. Yang, J. Li, O. Adeniyi and H. Chen

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jcpt.12029

  3. Pharmacokinetics

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Article
    3. Original Articles
    4. Pharmacokinetics
    5. Case Reports
    1. Effects of erythromycin at steady-state concentrations on the pharmacokinetics of ulipristal acetate (pages 512–517)

      O. Pohl, I. Osterloh and J-P Gotteland

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jcpt.12098

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      The aim of this study was to determine the effects of erythromycin at steady state concentrations on the pharmacokinetics of ulipristal acetate (UPA). Effects on pharmacokinetics of the mono-demethylated metabolite of UPA (PGL4002) were also evaluated. Subjects received oral UPA (20 mg) once daily on days 1 and 13 and twice daily erythromycin propionate administrations (500 mg) from days 9 through 17. Concomitant use of UPA with erythromycin at therapeutic concentrations led to a limited increase in Cmax and a 3-fold increase of AUCs for UPA and to a decrease in Cmax and an increase of AUCs and prolonged elimination for PGL4002. This indicates that inhibition of CYP3A4 impacted rate and extent of absorption of UPA and also its metabolism by slowing the elimination of its metabolite PGL4002.

    2. An evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of treprostinil diolamine in subjects with hepatic impairment (pages 518–523)

      L. Peterson, T. Marbury, J. Marier and K. Laliberte

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jcpt.12094

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      The study assessed the pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of treprostinil following oral administration of a single sustained-release 1 mg dose in subjects with hepatic impairment. Four cohorts, including healthy volunteers, and subjects with mild, moderate and severe hepatic impairment were enrolled. Thirty subjects completed the study. Mean treprostinil clearance values (CL/F) decreased with the severity of hepatic impairment. The decrease in CL/F resulted in a marked increase in exposure levels of treprostinil. The overall incidence of all AEs and the specific events of headache and nausea increased with severity of hepatic impairment. Based on these results, dosage adjustments should be performed in subjects with hepatic impairment.

  4. Case Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Article
    3. Original Articles
    4. Pharmacokinetics
    5. Case Reports
    1. Neurological and psychiatric adverse events with prucalopride: case report and possible mechanisms (pages 524–525)

      C. Carnovale, P. Pellegrino, V. Perrone, S. Antoniazzi, M. Pozzi, A. Nisic, E. Clementi and S. Radice

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jcpt.12087

    2. A high incidence of exanthematous eruption associated with niacin/laropiprant combination in Hong Kong Chinese patients (pages 528–532)

      Y.-L. Yang, M. Hu, M. Chang and B. Tomlinson

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jcpt.12096

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      We describe an unusually high proportion of Chinese patients (14%) who developed an exanthematous eruption soon after starting extended release (ER) niacin/laropiprant combination therapy. The relationship of the exanthematous eruption to lower body weight and the increase in dosage suggests a pharmacokinetic effect which may be related to increased exposure to niacin or its metabolites and provoked by inhibition of the DP1 receptor with laropiprant, as we have not seen this rash with niacin used alone. This may suggest that the southern Chinese population may have some genetic predisposition as such a high frequency of exanthematous reactions has not been reported in other populations.

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