Neural steroid sensitivity and aggression: comparing individuals of two songbird subspecies

Authors

  • C. M. Bergeon Burns,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Biology and Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA
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    • Equal author contribution.
  • K. A. Rosvall,

    1. Department of Biology and Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA
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    • Equal author contribution.
  • E. D. Ketterson

    1. Department of Biology and Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA
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Correspondence: Christine M. Bergeon Burns, Indiana University, Biology, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. Tel.: +812 855 1096; fax: 812 855 6705; e-mail: cbergeon@indiana.edu

Abstract

Hormones coordinate the expression of complex phenotypes and thus may play important roles in evolutionary processes. When populations diverge in hormone-mediated phenotypes, differences may arise via changes in circulating hormones, sensitivity to hormones or both. Determining the relative importance of signal and sensitivity requires consideration of both inter- and intrapopulation variation in hormone levels, hormone sensitivity and phenotype, but such studies are rare, particularly among closely related taxa. We compared males of two subspecies of the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis) for territorial aggression and associations among behaviour, circulating testosterone (T), and gene expression of androgen receptor (AR), aromatase (AROM) and oestrogen receptor α in three behaviourally relevant brain regions. Thus, we examined the degree to which evolution may shape behaviour via changes in plasma T as compared with key sex steroid binding/converting molecules. We found that the white-winged junco (J. h. aikeni) was more aggressive than the smaller, less ornamented Carolina junco (J. h. carolinensis). The subspecies did not differ in circulating testosterone, but did differ significantly in the abundance of AR and AROM mRNA in key areas of the brain. Within populations, both gene expression and circulating T co-varied significantly with individual differences in aggression. Notably, the differences identified between populations were opposite to those predicted by the patterns among individuals within populations. These findings suggest that hormone–phenotype relationships may evolve via multiple pathways, and that changes that have occurred over evolutionary time do not necessarily reflect standing physiological variation on which current evolutionary processes may act.

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