Journal of Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 101 Issue 3

May 2013

Volume 101, Issue 3

Pages 545–836

  1. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    3. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    5. Invasion ecology
    6. Determinants of plant community diversity and structure
    7. Plant–herbivore interactions
    8. Habitat fragmentation
    9. Plant population and community dynamics
    10. Plant–climate interactions
    11. Plant–soil (below-ground) interactions
    12. Reproductive ecology
    13. Erratum
    14. Corrigendum
    1. Special Feature – Future Directions No. 8

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Plants do not count… or do they? New perspectives on the universality of senescence (pages 545–554)

      Roberto Salguero-Gómez, Richard P. Shefferson and Michael J. Hutchings

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12089

      Understanding the conditions under which senescence has evolved is of general importance across biology, ecology, evolution, conservation biology, medicine, gerontology, law and social sciences. The question ‘why is senescence universal or why is it not?’ naturally calls for an evolutionary perspective. Senescence is a puzzling phenomenon, and new insights will be gained by uniting methods, theories and observations from formal demography, animal demography and plant population ecology. Plants are more amenable than animals to experiments investigating senescence, and there is a wealth of published plant demographic data that enable interpretation of experimental results in the context of their full life cycles. It is time to make plants count in the field of senescence.

    2. Special Feature – Standard Papers

      Photo-oxidative stress markers reveal absence of physiological deterioration with ageing in Borderea pyrenaica, an extraordinarily long-lived herb (pages 555–565)

      Melanie Morales, Marta Oñate, María B. García and Sergi Munné-Bosch

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12080

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Neither males nor females of the extraordinarily long-lived Borderea pyrenaica show age-dependent signs of oxidative stress. This observation suggests that age-induced oxidative stress is not a universal feature of ageing in perennial plants. Indeed, females older than 100 years showed signs of negative senescence, in that they registered improved physiological performance with increasing age.

    3. Prolonged dormancy interacts with senescence for two perennial herbs (pages 566–576)

      Juha Tuomi, Elizabeth E. Crone, Jennifer R. Gremer, Anne Jäkäläniemi, Peter Lesica, Bård Pedersen and Satu Ramula

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12086

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      We develop a modelling framework for how prolonged dormancy may affect senescence in perennial plants. Using this framework for long-term demographic data from two perennial herbs, the present study shows mixed evidence for senescence in perennial plants. Our results indicate that prolonged dormancy interacts with the age-dependence of vital rates and may sometimes retard the process of senescence.

    4. Longitudinal analysis in Plantago: strength of selection and reverse age analysis reveal age-indeterminate senescence (pages 577–584)

      Richard P. Shefferson and Deborah A. Roach

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12079

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      The hypothesis that plants escape senescence generally assumes that plants can continue to grow larger and increase reproduction as they get older. The results here show that size and reproduction decline with age and the rates of these declines toward death are lifespan- and age-dependent. Further research is needed to delineate the importance of age-determinate vs. age-indeterminate factors in senescence patterns across species.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Age, stage and senescence in plants (pages 585–595)

      Hal Caswell and Roberto Salguero-Gómez

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12088

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Theories for the evolution of senescence focus on the decline with age in the magnitude of the selection gradient on age-specific mortality. This decline implies that mortality late in life has less impact on fitness than mortality early in life. The demography of plants, however, often depends on size or stage rather than on age alone. We develop an age-stage classified model and show that in such a population the selection gradient on mortality may increase, rather than decrease, with age within a stage, leading to contra-senescent selection.

    6. The pace and shape of senescence in angiosperms (pages 596–606)

      Annette Baudisch, Roberto Salguero-Gómez, Owen R. Jones, Tomasz Wrycza, Cyril Mbeau-Ache, Miguel Franco and Fernando Colchero

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12084

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Frequency distribution of shape values for different growth forms. The dashed gray vertical line marks the boundary of senescence. Below this point, species show negative senescence, at that point species show negligible senescence and above that point species show senescence.

  2. Invasion ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    3. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    5. Invasion ecology
    6. Determinants of plant community diversity and structure
    7. Plant–herbivore interactions
    8. Habitat fragmentation
    9. Plant population and community dynamics
    10. Plant–climate interactions
    11. Plant–soil (below-ground) interactions
    12. Reproductive ecology
    13. Erratum
    14. Corrigendum
    1. Pathogen accumulation and long-term dynamics of plant invasions (pages 607–613)

      S. Luke Flory and Keith Clay

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12078

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Here we briefly review the patterns and potential mechanisms of pathogen accumulation on invasive plant species and outline the primary needs for future research. We provide conceptual models to describe the potential outcomes of pathogen accumulation for invasive and resident native species and describe observational, experimental, and modeling research approaches.

  3. Determinants of plant community diversity and structure

    1. Top of page
    2. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    3. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    5. Invasion ecology
    6. Determinants of plant community diversity and structure
    7. Plant–herbivore interactions
    8. Habitat fragmentation
    9. Plant population and community dynamics
    10. Plant–climate interactions
    11. Plant–soil (below-ground) interactions
    12. Reproductive ecology
    13. Erratum
    14. Corrigendum
    1. Large herbivores favour species diversity but have mixed impacts on phylogenetic community structure in an African savanna ecosystem (pages 614–625)

      Kowiyou Yessoufou, T. Jonathan Davies, Olivier Maurin, Maria Kuzmina, Hanno Schaefer, Michelle van der Bank and Vincent Savolainen

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12059

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Extinction of large mammal herbivores will have cascading effects on plant diversity; however, impacts on plant community structure are contingent on initial conditions. This research has implications for best practice when managing large herbivores and natural habitats.

    2. Fine-scale spatial patterns in grassland communities depend on species clonal dispersal ability and interactions with neighbours (pages 626–636)

      M.-L. Benot, A.-K. Bittebiere, A. Ernoult, Bernard Clément and Cendrine Mony

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12066

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using a garden experiment, we investigated some mechanisms responsible for spatial patterning in grasslands. We compared the spatial patterns of plant species differing in their clonal dispersal abilities and grown in several types of assemblages. Our results highlight that species spatial patterns not only depended on the clonal dispersal ability of species, but were also modified by the clonal dispersal ability of neighbours.

    3. Uncovering multiscale effects of aridity and biotic interactions on the functional structure of Mediterranean shrublands (pages 637–649)

      Nicolas Gross, Luca Börger, Sara I. Soriano-Morales, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, José L. Quero, Miguel García-Gómez, Enrique Valencia-Gómez and Fernando T. Maestre

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12063

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      Using a novel trait-based and multiscale approach, we show that competition and facilitation jointly determine the functional structure of Mediterranean shrublands along a large aridity gradient. Competition mostly impacted on dominant plant species whereas facilitation affected subordinate and rare species. Overall, shift from competition to facilitation appears to be trait-dependent along the aridity gradient.

    4. Changes in abiotic influences on seed plants and ferns during 18 years of primary succession on Puerto Rican landslides (pages 650–661)

      Lawrence R. Walker, Aaron B. Shiels, Peter J. Bellingham, Ashley D. Sparrow, Ned Fetcher, Fred H. Landau and Deborah J. Lodge

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Abiotic variables have important influences on plant succession on landslides and the relative influence of different abiotic variables changes with time. Improved predictability of temporal dynamics will rely not only on understanding the effects of initial disturbances and subsequent biological responses but also on the different and changing influences exerted by each abiotic variable.

    5. Do plant traits retrieved from a database accurately predict on-site measurements? (pages 662–670)

      Verena Cordlandwehr, Rebecca L. Meredith, Wim A. Ozinga, Renée M. Bekker, Jan M. van Groenendael and Jan P. Bakker

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12091

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study reveals that the accuracy of traits retrieved from a database depends on the level of aggregation (lower at community level), the trait (lower in plastic traits) and the habitat type (lower in extreme habitats). For studies focussing on processes mainly acting at the site scale (e.g. trait-environment relationships) traits retrieved from a regional database and filtered according to habitat will probably lead to good results. Whereas studying processes acting at the plot scale (e.g. niche partitioning), requires the additional effort of measuring traits on-site.

  4. Plant–herbivore interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    3. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    5. Invasion ecology
    6. Determinants of plant community diversity and structure
    7. Plant–herbivore interactions
    8. Habitat fragmentation
    9. Plant population and community dynamics
    10. Plant–climate interactions
    11. Plant–soil (below-ground) interactions
    12. Reproductive ecology
    13. Erratum
    14. Corrigendum
    1. Caribou exclusion during a population low increases deciduous and evergreen shrub species biomass and nitrogen pools in low Arctic tundra (pages 671–683)

      Tara J. Zamin and Paul Grogan

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12082

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Caribou exclusion during a population low resulted in ecologically significant changes in the distribution of plant above-ground biomass and nitrogen, further increasing the dominance of the three most abundant shrubs. These findings demonstrate that, despite uncertainty in herd recovery, Rangifer browsing impacts to both deciduous and evergreen shrub species should be considered for more robust projections of Arctic vegetation change.

    2. Let the best one stay: screening of ant defenders by Acacia host plants functions independently of partner choice or host sanctions (pages 684–688)

      Martin Heil

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12060

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Defensive ant–plant mutualisms are challenged by non-defending exploiter ants. However, the hosts can favour the persistence of defending mutualists by nourishing them with high amounts of extrafloral nectar, thereby enhancing their energy supply and thus their competitive capacities. Mutualisms remain stable when partner screening is based on traits of direct relevance for the mutualistic interaction.

    3. The impact of secondary compounds and functional characteristics on lichen palatability and decomposition (pages 689–700)

      Johan Asplund and David A. Wardle

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12075

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We have shown that lichen carbon-based secondary compounds (CBSCs) regulate key processes such as lichenivory and decomposition, that lichen decomposability but not palatability are related to traits, and that these two processes are unrelated across species. These results highlight the potential role of lichen species differences in influencing ecosystem processes relating to decomposition and nutrient cycling and the role that grazers may play in driving this.

  5. Habitat fragmentation

    1. Top of page
    2. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    3. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    5. Invasion ecology
    6. Determinants of plant community diversity and structure
    7. Plant–herbivore interactions
    8. Habitat fragmentation
    9. Plant population and community dynamics
    10. Plant–climate interactions
    11. Plant–soil (below-ground) interactions
    12. Reproductive ecology
    13. Erratum
    14. Corrigendum
    1. Specialist species of wood-inhabiting fungi struggle while generalists thrive in fragmented boreal forests (pages 701–712)

      Jenni Nordén, Reijo Penttilä, Juha Siitonen, Erkki Tomppo and Otso Ovaskainen

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12085

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We show that the expected number of red-listed species per a fixed amount of similar resources (dead trees) can be even more than 10 times higher in well-connected than in fragmented surroundings, and thus protecting high-quality areas that are well connected is conservationally more effective than protecting small fragments distributed across the landscape.

    2. Forest edges show contrasting effects on an austral mistletoe due to differences in pollination and seed dispersal (pages 713–721)

      Ainhoa Magrach, Luis Santamaría and Asier R. Larrinaga

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12083

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The alteration and transformation of the areas surrounding native forests due to anthropogenic disturbance can lead to ‘edge effects’. Our study shows clearly how secondary and tertiary responses to forest edges acted in opposite directions (increasing or decreasing plant reproductive performance), highlighting the need to study several successive processes that impact upon plant fitness under disturbance.

  6. Plant population and community dynamics

    1. Top of page
    2. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    3. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    5. Invasion ecology
    6. Determinants of plant community diversity and structure
    7. Plant–herbivore interactions
    8. Habitat fragmentation
    9. Plant population and community dynamics
    10. Plant–climate interactions
    11. Plant–soil (below-ground) interactions
    12. Reproductive ecology
    13. Erratum
    14. Corrigendum
    1. Trait-mediated effects of environmental filtering on tree community dynamics (pages 722–733)

      Jesse R. Lasky, I-Fang Sun, Sheng-Hsin Su, Zueng-Sang Chen and Timothy H. Keitt

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12065

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Individual performance is a function of an individual's traits and its environment. This function, known as an environmental filter, varies in space and affects community composition. We characterized trait-mediated environmental filters that underlie spatial niche differentiation and life history trade-offs for individuals in a tree community. The trait axes with the strongest filtering (a & c) and greatest variation in filters are shown (b & d).

    2. Evidence for transient dynamics in plant populations based on long-term demographic data (pages 734–742)

      Martha M. Ellis

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12069

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Methods based on largest possible responses tend to overemphasize the role of transient dynamics. These results suggest that traditional, asymptotic analyses may be appropriate in many cases. Measures of transient potential can be helpful for identifying species and situations that may be prone to larger transient responses, but do not necessarily indicate that transient dynamics are more important in those systems.

    3. Genetically based vertical transmission drives the frequency of the symbiosis between grasses and systemic fungal endophytes (pages 743–752)

      Anaïs Gibert and Laurent Hazard

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12073

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      Theoretically, two mechanisms might contribute to variation in hereditary symbiont frequency among host populations: the impact of symbioses on host fitness, and symbiont transmission to offspring. We studied both mechanisms using a grass-endophyte symbiosis in a native grass. We showed that transmission: (i) drives symbiont frequency variation in host populations, (ii) is not directly linked to the impact of symbiosis on host fitness, and (iii) is genetically based at population level.

    4. Variability in functional traits mediates plant interactions along stress gradients (pages 753–762)

      Christian Schöb, Cristina Armas, Manuela Guler, Iván Prieto and Francisco I. Pugnaire

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12062

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      This study demonstrates the generally overlooked importance of a nurse plant's vigor and morphology for its facilitative effects. Functional traits of the cushion plant Arenaria tetraquetra ssp. amabilis varied distinctively along two opposing stress gradients, in parallel to the magnitude of differences in micro-environmental conditions between cushions and the surrounding open area, and also to the facilitation effect of cushions.

  7. Plant–climate interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    3. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    5. Invasion ecology
    6. Determinants of plant community diversity and structure
    7. Plant–herbivore interactions
    8. Habitat fragmentation
    9. Plant population and community dynamics
    10. Plant–climate interactions
    11. Plant–soil (below-ground) interactions
    12. Reproductive ecology
    13. Erratum
    14. Corrigendum
    1. Subordinate plant species enhance community resistance against drought in semi-natural grasslands (pages 763–773)

      Pierre Mariotte, Charlotte Vandenberghe, Paul Kardol, Frank Hagedorn and Alexandre Buttler

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12064

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      While many experiments have been carried out to determine the effects of plant diversity on plant community insurance to drought, the results are still contradictory. Here, we demonstrated that, independent of plant diversity, the presence of drought-resistant subordinate species increases plant community insurance against drought and hence is important for the functioning of grassland ecosystems.

    2. Inferring local processes from macro-scale phenological pattern: a comparison of two methods (pages 774–783)

      Albert B. Phillimore, Konstantinos Proios, Naiara O'Mahony, Rodolphe Bernard, Alexa M. Lord, Sian Atkinson and Richard J. Smithers

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12067

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      Time-window and growing degree-day methods provide remarkably congruent insights into the processes underpinning geographic variation in Q. robur first leafing dates. We find that a spatially invariant plastic response to temperature dominates spatiotemporal phenological variation, which means that it may be reasonable to substitute space for time to project how this species will respond to climate change. This study demonstrates the contribution that top-down macroecological approaches can make to our understanding of large-scale phenological processes.

    3. Latitudinal gradients as natural laboratories to infer species' responses to temperature (pages 784–795)

      Pieter De Frenne, Bente J. Graae, Francisco Rodríguez-Sánchez, Annette Kolb, Olivier Chabrerie, Guillaume Decocq, Hanne De Kort, An De Schrijver, Martin Diekmann, Ove Eriksson, Robert Gruwez, Martin Hermy, Jonathan Lenoir, Jan Plue, David A. Coomes and Kris Verheyen

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12074

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Macroclimatic variation along latitudinal gradients provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the role of temperature and the potential impacts of climate warming on terrestrial organisms. We review the use of latitudinal gradients for ecological climate-change research, in comparison with altitudinal gradients and experimental warming, and illustrate their use and caveats with a meta-analysis of latitudinal intraspecific variation in life-history traits of plants.

    4. Local adaptation and plasticity of Erysimum capitatum to altitude: its implications for responses to climate change (pages 796–805)

      Eunsuk Kim and Kathleen Donohue

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12077

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      As an effort to predict how alpine plant species may respond to climate change, we examined local adaptation and plasticity to altitude using Erysimum capitatum—a mustard that occurs in a broad altitudinal range. The results imply that alpine E. capitatum would suffer reduced seedling recruitment and higher mortality as a direct response to altered environment and possibly as a result of past adaptation to high altitude. In addition, environmental tracking by low-altitude populations is predicted to have a limited role in maintaining future populations.

  8. Plant–soil (below-ground) interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    3. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    5. Invasion ecology
    6. Determinants of plant community diversity and structure
    7. Plant–herbivore interactions
    8. Habitat fragmentation
    9. Plant population and community dynamics
    10. Plant–climate interactions
    11. Plant–soil (below-ground) interactions
    12. Reproductive ecology
    13. Erratum
    14. Corrigendum
    1. Competitive interactions across a soil fertility gradient in a multispecies forest (pages 806–818)

      K. David Coates, Erica B. Lilles and Rasmus Astrup

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12072

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Whether plant competition grows stronger or weaker across a soil fertility gradient is an area of great debate in plant ecology. The intensity of competition among trees across a fertility gradient in a multi-species forest was species- and context-specific and more complicated than predicted by any one of the dominant existing theories in plant ecology.

    2. Preferences or plasticity in nitrogen acquisition by understorey palms in a tropical montane forest (pages 819–825)

      Kelly M. Andersen and Benjamin L. Turner

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12070

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We found that patterns in the distribution of understorey palms were related to nitrogen (N) uptake rates rather than preferences for N chemical forms. Down-regulation of N uptake rates may be an important adaptation for plant species associated with low N soils, with plasticity in N acquisition patterns from various N sources important in alleviating competition for soil N.

  9. Reproductive ecology

    1. Top of page
    2. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    3. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    5. Invasion ecology
    6. Determinants of plant community diversity and structure
    7. Plant–herbivore interactions
    8. Habitat fragmentation
    9. Plant population and community dynamics
    10. Plant–climate interactions
    11. Plant–soil (below-ground) interactions
    12. Reproductive ecology
    13. Erratum
    14. Corrigendum
    1. Convergent specialization – the sharing of pollinators by sympatric genera of sexually deceptive orchids (pages 826–835)

      Ryan D. Phillips, Tingbao Xu, Michael F. Hutchinson, Kingsley W. Dixon and Rod Peakall

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12068

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Synthesis. This case of pollinator sharing confirms that morphological traits do not place a strong constraint on the evolution of sexual deception. However, interspecific differences in floral traits have important consequences for converting attraction into pollination, suggesting that selection can act to increase efficiency at multiple steps of the pollination process. This system provides a novel opportunity to elucidate the chemical, visual and morphological adaptations underpinning the evolution of sexual mimicry.

  10. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    3. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    5. Invasion ecology
    6. Determinants of plant community diversity and structure
    7. Plant–herbivore interactions
    8. Habitat fragmentation
    9. Plant population and community dynamics
    10. Plant–climate interactions
    11. Plant–soil (below-ground) interactions
    12. Reproductive ecology
    13. Erratum
    14. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum (page 836)

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12061

      This article corrects:

      Shrubs and herbaceous seed flow in a semi-arid landscape: dual functioning of shrubs as trap and barrier

      Vol. 101, Issue 1, 97–106, Article first published online: 26 NOV 2012

  11. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    3. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    4. SPECIAL FEATURE: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN WHOLE-PLANT SENESCENCE
    5. Invasion ecology
    6. Determinants of plant community diversity and structure
    7. Plant–herbivore interactions
    8. Habitat fragmentation
    9. Plant population and community dynamics
    10. Plant–climate interactions
    11. Plant–soil (below-ground) interactions
    12. Reproductive ecology
    13. Erratum
    14. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum (page 836)

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12018

      This article corrects:

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