Behavioral Treatment of Insomnia: Also Effective for Nocturia

Authors

  • Shachi Tyagi MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    • Address correspondence to Dr. Shachi Tyagi, Division of Geriatric Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 3471 Fifth Avenue, Suite 500, Kaufmann Building, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.

      E-mail: tyagis@upmc.edu

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  • Neil M. Resnick MD,

    1. Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Subashan Perera PhD,

    1. Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Timothy H. Monk PhD, DSc,

    1. Sleep and Chronobiology Center, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Martica H. Hall PhD,

    1. Sleep and Chronobiology Center, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Daniel J. Buysse MD

    1. Sleep and Chronobiology Center, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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Abstract

Objectives

To evaluate changes in self-reported nocturia in community-dwelling adults aged 60 and older who received behavioral treatment for chronic insomnia.

Design

Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial of a behavioral intervention for sleep.

Setting

Academic medical center.

Participants

Of the 79 enrollees, this analysis focused on 30 who, in addition to insomnia, also reported at least one nightly episode of waking up to void.

Intervention

The brief behavioral treatment of insomnia (BBTI) group (n = 14) received instructions on reducing time in bed and setting a regular sleep schedule. The information control (IC) group (n = 16) received printed materials. A nurse clinician delivered both interventions.

Measurements

Self-reported nocturnal awakenings to void assessed daily for 14 days at baseline and 4 weeks after the intervention. Participants who reported at least one episode of nocturia per night at baseline were included in this analysis.

Results

In individuals with nocturia at baseline, the total number of nocturnal voids over the 14-day assessment period decreased by 6.5 ± 4.8 in the BBTI group and increased by 1.3 ± 7.3 in the IC group (P = .04, effect size 0.82). After adjusting for baseline nocturia episodes, the difference remained significant (P = .05).

Conclusion

In older adults with concurrent insomnia and nocturia, behavioral treatment directed solely at insomnia may also improve self-reported nocturia. Behavioral treatment of insomnia should be further investigated for its effect on nocturia in individuals with concurrent insomnia and nocturia.

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