SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Keywords:

  • hospitalization;
  • dementia;
  • self-efficacy;
  • caregiver burden

Objectives

To describe the factors associated with burden that caregivers of cognitively impaired older adults (dementia, delirium, or both) at the time of hospitalization experienced.

Design

Cross-sectional data analyses.

Setting

Three hospitals—one academic tertiary hospital and two associated community hospitals.

Participants

Caregivers (N = 495) of cognitively impaired older adults at the time of hospital admission.

Measurements

Multivariable linear regression was performed to analyze the effect of the independent variables (caregiver: demographic characteristics, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy; older adult: neuropsychiatric symptoms, delirium, functional deficits) on caregiver burden.

Results

Higher burden was associated with younger caregiver age (P = .02), being a spouse (P = .03), depressive symptoms (< .001), caregivers’ lower perceived self-efficacy in managing care recipient symptoms (P = .002), and limited finances at the end of the month (P = .01). Caregiver burden was also strongly associated with the care recipient factors distressing neuropsychiatric symptoms (P = .001), delirium (P = .001), and greater functional deficits in basic activities of daily living (P = .001).

Conclusion

These findings suggest that caregivers of older adults who were cognitively impaired at hospital admission experience burden. Understanding the factors that contribute to burden at the time of hospitalization for caregivers of persons with cognitive impairment can inform the development of interventions targeted throughout the hospitalization that have the potential to decrease burden.