Get access

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet and New and Recurrent Root Caries Events in Men

Authors

  • Elizabeth K. Kaye PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
    2. Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts
    • Address correspondence to Elizabeth K. Kaye, PhD, Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, 560 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118. E-mail: kralle@bu.edu

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Brenda Heaton PhD,

    1. Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Woosung Sohn PhD,

    1. Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sharron E. Rich MPH,

    1. Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
    2. Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bedford, Massachusetts
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Avron Spiro III PhD,

    1. Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
    2. Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts
    3. Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
    4. Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Raul I. Garcia DMD, MMSc

    1. Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
    2. Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Objectives

To examine the effect of overall dietary quality on number of teeth with new or recurrent root caries events during follow-up (root caries increment).

Design

Prospective study with dental examinations approximately every 3 years over 20 years.

Setting

Veterans Affairs Dental Longitudinal Study in greater Boston, Massachusetts, area.

Participants

Men aged 47 to 90 (N = 533).

Measurements

A single calibrated examiner assessed root caries and restorations, calculus, probing pocket depth, and attachment loss on each tooth at each examination. The adjusted root caries increment (root-ADJCI) was computed from new and recurrent root caries events on teeth with recession of 2 mm or more. Dietary information was obtained from food frequency questionnaires. An adherence score was computed by comparing consumption frequency of 10 food groups (fruits, vegetables, total dairy, low-fat dairy, meat, total grains, high-fiber grains, legumes, fats, sweets) from the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet guidelines. Mean root-ADJCIs were compared according to DASH adherence score quartile using generalized linear negative binomial regression models, controlling for age, number of teeth at risk of root caries, time at risk of root caries, calculus, presence of removable denture, history of dental prophylaxis, body mass index, and smoking status.

Results

Men with DASH adherence scores in the highest quartile had a 30% lower mean root-ADJCI (1.86 teeth) than those in the lowest quartile (2.68 teeth) (P = .03). Root-ADJCI was lower with greater adherence to recommendations for vegetables and total grains and greater with greater sugar-sweetened carbonated beverage consumption. Root caries incidence rate did not vary significantly between quartiles.

Conclusion

A higher-quality diet may reduce root caries risk in older men.

Ancillary