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Performance of the experimental resins and dental nanocomposites at varying deformation rates

Authors

  • Naresh Kumar,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Science of Dental Materials, Institute of Dentistry, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro, Pakistan
    • Correspondence

      N. Kumar, Department of Science of Dental Materials, Institute of Dentistry, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro 76090, Pakistan.

      Tel: +92-333-2818500

      Email: naresh.kumar@lumhs.edu.pk

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  • Adrian Shortall

    1. Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, England
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Abstract

Aim

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the bi-axial flexural strength of experimental unfilled resins and resin-based composites at varying deformation rates following 1-week dry, 1-week wet, and 13-week wet storage regimes.

Methods

A total of 270 disc-shaped specimens (12 mm diameter, 1 mm thickness) of either unfilled resins or experimental resin-based composites comprising of three groups (= 90) were fabricated. Three groups of each unfilled resin and resin-based composites (= 90) were stored for 1 week under dry conditions, and at 1 and 13 weeks under wet conditions (37 ± 1°C) before testing. The bi-axial flexural strength of each unfilled resin and resin-based composites group was determined at a 0.1, 1, and 10 mm/min deformation rate (= 30).

Results

The unfilled resins revealed a deformation rate dependence following all storage regimes; however, the addition of fillers in the unfilled resins modified such reliance following the 1-week dry and 13-week wet storage regimes. In contrast, a lower bi-axial flexural strength of the 1-week wet resin-based composites specimens at a 0.1 mm/min deformation rate was identified.

Conclusion

A lower bi-axial flexural strength of the 1-week wet resin-based composites specimens at a low deformation rate suggests that premature failure of resin-based composites restorations might occur in patients with parafunctional habits, such as bruxism.

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