Influence of surface free energy of denture base and liner materials on Candida albicans biofilms

Authors

  • Wander J. da Silva,

    1. Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Piracicaba, Brazil
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  • Cristiane Maria B. Leal,

    1. Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Piracicaba, Brazil
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  • Flávia C. Viu,

    1. Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Piracicaba, Brazil
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  • Letícia M. Gonçalves,

    1. Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Piracicaba, Brazil
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  • Célia Marisa R. Barbosa,

    1. Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Piracicaba, Brazil
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  • Altair A. Del Bel Cury

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Piracicaba, Brazil
    • Correspondence

      Dr A. A. Del Bel Cury, Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas Piracicaba 13414-903, São Paulo, Brazil.

      Tel: +55 19 2106-5294

      Fax: +55 19 2106-5211

      Email: altcury@fop.unicamp.br

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Abstract

Aim

This study aimed to evaluate the influence of surface free energy (SFE) of denture base and liner materials on Candida albicans biofilm development.

Methods

Discs were fabricated using poly(methyl methacrylate) acrylic resin and poly(ethyl methacrylate) denture liner, according to the manufacturers' instructions. For SFE test, discs were pellicle-coated with saliva alone, saliva + blood plasma, or blood plasma alone. Candida albicans biofilms were allowed to form on pellicle-coated discs for 48 h. Biofilms were evaluated for cell counts, metabolic activity, and structural characteristics at adhesion phase (after 1.5 h of development) and at biofilm maturity (after 48 h of development). Data were analyzed by anova and Tukey tests using a significance level of 5%.

Results

Saliva + blood plasma pellicles had a higher SFE compared to pellicles of saliva or blood plasma alone (P < 0.001). Differences in SFE by pellicle-coating did not affect the cell counts, metabolic activity, or structure at the adhesion phase (P > 0.05). In contrast, the presence of blood plasma resulted in higher cell counts, biovolume, and thickness of mature biofilms on both materials (P < 0.001).

Conclusions

Increases in SFE from pellicle-coating leads to robust mature C. albicans biofilms on both denture materials.

Ancillary