Small Ubiquitin-Like Modifier Conjugating Enzyme with Active Site Mutation Acts as Dominant Negative Inhibitor of SUMO Conjugation in Arabidopsis

Authors

  • Konstantin Tomanov,

    1. Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Center for Molecular Biology, University of Vienna, A-1030 Vienna, Austria
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  • Christian Hardtke,

    1. Department of Plant Molecular Biology, University of Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
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  • Ruchika Budhiraja,

    1. Department of Plant Developmental Biology, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, D-50829 Cologne, Germany
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  • Rebecca Hermkes,

    1. Department of Plant Developmental Biology, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, D-50829 Cologne, Germany
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  • George Coupland,

    1. Department of Plant Developmental Biology, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, D-50829 Cologne, Germany
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  • Andreas Bachmair

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Center for Molecular Biology, University of Vienna, A-1030 Vienna, Austria
    2. Department of Plant Developmental Biology, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, D-50829 Cologne, Germany
      Tel: +43 1 4277 74811; Fax: +43 1 4277 9748; E-mail: andreas.bachmair@univie.ac.at
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Tel: +43 1 4277 74811; Fax: +43 1 4277 9748; E-mail: andreas.bachmair@univie.ac.at

Abstract

Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) conjugation affects a broad range of processes in plants, including growth, flower initiation, pathogen defense, and responses to abiotic stress. Here, we investigate in vivo and in vitro a SUMO conjugating enzyme with a Cys to Ser change in the active site, and show that it has a dominant negative effect. In planta expression significantly perturbs normal development, leading to growth retardation, early flowering and gene expression changes. We suggest that the mutant protein can serve as a probe to investigate sumoylation, also in plants for which poor genetic infrastructure precludes analysis via loss-of-function mutants.

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