Pharmacokinetic analysis of oral doxycycline in rhesus macaques

Authors

  • Monica E. Embers,

    Corresponding author
    • Division of Bacteriology & Parasitology, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, Covington, LA, USA
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  • Nicole R. Hasenkampf,

    1. Division of Bacteriology & Parasitology, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, Covington, LA, USA
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  • Dale G. Embers,

    1. Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
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  • Lara A. Doyle

    1. Division of Veterinary Medicine, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, Covington, LA, USA
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Correspondence

Monica E. Embers, PhD, Division of Bacteriology and Parasitology, Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC), Tulane University Health Sciences Center, 18703 Three Rivers Road, Covington, LA 70433, USA.

Tel.: 985 871 6607;

fax: 985 871 6390;

e-mail: members@tulane.edu

Abstract

Background

Following administration of an antibiotic, the concentration in blood changes over time and is dependent on the type of antibiotic, the route and species of the individual. The most relevant pharmacodynamic property of a bacteriostatic antibiotic such as doxycycline is the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), whereas pharmacokinetics may include rates of absorption and elimination from blood.

Methods

We determined serum concentrations of doxycycline following administration of 5 mg/kg in two macaques.

Results

The area under the concentration–time curve over 24 hours (AUC0–24) following two doses was extrapolated from the curve over 12 hours following a single dose, with the purpose of calculating the AUC0–24:MIC.

Conclusions

Other than a somewhat faster rate of elimination, the PK-PD values for doxycycline in macaques appears similar to those determined for humans. This information will be valuable for treating disease in macaques and for research in bacterial infection models that use macaques.

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